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Xibai Xu
A quick analysis of CQ's list reveals some interesting details of how censorship works in China
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Xibai Xu 19 Aug 17
Also none of the articles related to the keyword famine is on the list...
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Ryan Dunch 20 Aug 17
Replying to @xuxibai @jwassers and 2 others
To preserve this useful comment in a more permanent location, pls consider joining H-Asia & posting it there.
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Professor Anne-Marie Brady 20 Aug 17
This is only one example, censorship is not only via keyword search--though it clearly was this time.
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Ben Bland 20 Aug 17
Replying to @xuxibai @jwassers and 2 others
Interesting digging, thanks
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Carole Couper 20 Aug 17
Replying to @xuxibai @jwassers and 2 others
Good to see that censorship is not such an easy exercise, even with large manpower and resources. Similar findings with internet keywords.
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Viv Marsh 20 Aug 17
Replying to @xuxibai @jwassers and 2 others
Yes - I also suspect that the 2 German articles became banned only because keywords turned up in the title that are the same in English.
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mhar4 須平心再想。 20 Aug 17
Replying to @xuxibai @jwassers and 2 others
The specifics don't matter. It's about showing where power lies.
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Yi-Zhi Huang 20 Aug 17
I would like to suggest that the whole board of China Quarterly resign and create a new journal with the same board with another publisher.
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kje - FREE ASSANGE NOW 20 Aug 17
Replying to @xuxibai @jwassers and 2 others
This is interesting - cf the ham-fisted internet censorship which blocks plenty of innocuous websites. Not competently managed at all.
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