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Xan Gregg
Playing with data, making graphs. Coding . Creator of & . . Views my own.
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Xan Gregg Aug 1
I uploaded the practice video for my "Understanding Smoothers through Interactive Examples" talk to . I summarize four smoother types (regression, moving average, spline and loess) with interactive exploration of pros and cons of each.
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Xan Gregg Jul 31
Replying to @jscarto @sheetz @Wawa
Interesting inversion of the usual diverging color map, with darker colors in the middle to focus on the contested areas.
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Xan Gregg Jul 30
Practicing for my talk on smoothers for tomorrow. Finally got it down to 21 minutes, but target is 20 so took out one more example. Latest run: 26 minutes. 🤔
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Xan Gregg Jul 27
Replying to @jschwabish
There's a "Set up slide show" that lets you play in a window instead of full screen, so you don't have to turn off spellchecking. And Keynote has recently added "Play slideshow in window".
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Xan Gregg Jul 21
Clicked the link and got a blank page. Now I know for sure I'm not a "bona fide researcher".
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Xan Gregg Jul 21
Next week I'll be presenting at 's Data Science, Statistics & Visualization 2020, now virtual. Topic: Understanding Smoothers through Interactive Examples
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Xan Gregg Jul 18
This sounded at first too simple for a designed experiment, but the constraints make it interesting: "1. We can only use at most 6 of the 10 cars at any time. 2. The Lane Number may be important, so we want to try to take it into account."
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Xan Gregg Jul 14
Replying to @danz_68
Good idea on the time shift. I think the original data had some spikes on certain even time values. You can see the humps here (eg 18:00) but it's not the same evidence as seeing the values at that exact time.
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Xan Gregg Jul 14
Replying to @danz_68
Interesting that the overall pattern is clearer with larger dots (relative to the graph size), but it makes sense. These dots are in a rectangular grid pattern and I've seen more of a hex pattern before. What determines that?
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Xan Gregg Jul 13
Nice to present today "at" Data Science Community of Practice seminar. Though without seeing the audience I did occasionally wonder, "I am still connected?" Good to get some discussion at the end.
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Xan Gregg Jul 13
Replying to @_Kcnarf @danz_68
Or "encoding twice" not in the redundancy sense but in the sense of splitting it into 2 separate encodings: KDE curve for the low freq part (trend) and dot density for high freq part ("error"). The latter could also be colored stripes on a KDE tho cardinality sense is lost.
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Xan Gregg Jul 13
Replying to @danz_68 @ampanmdagaba
Maybe that's it. I was using yes/given.
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Xan Gregg Jul 13
Replying to @danz_68 @ampanmdagaba
Interesting that the peaks don't seem as aligned with 85%, 90%, 95%. And the odd peak ~73% for the smallest group. Artifact or something to it? Not seeing that in the finer histogram view, for instance.
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Xan Gregg Jul 13
Replying to @danz_68
I think the current online source is . My graph shows reports from April 2012.
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Xan Gregg Jul 12
Trying sinaplot jitter on recent Russian voting results, grouped by district size ("nominal"). One dot for each voting station. Irregularities at the 5s visible.
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Xan Gregg Jul 12
Experimenting with kernel density shaped random jitter (a la sinaplot). Seems only useful when there are a lot of points (too many for dodging). Is it better than random uniform jitter?
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Xan Gregg Jul 12
Replying to @fourbadcats
Woke up this morning realizing I had mislabeled this graph. It's ignoring the first digit, not the first two digits. And remaking it, I see I neglected to filter out the small districts, which inflated the x0.0% counts. Better now.
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Xan Gregg Jul 11
Replying to @fourbadcats
Just to make sure it wasn't a mathematical artifact, I made another version after adding/subtracting up to half of percent to the yes votes. And I had already removed small polling stations since they have limited decimal expansions.
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Xan Gregg Jul 11
Replying to @fourbadcats
I made this to see the distribution of the first two digits after the percentage decimal (xx in pp.xx%). Big peaks at pp.00% and pp.50%. Minor peaks at pp.10%, etc.
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Xan Gregg Jul 8
Replying to @tinasw
Thanks. I missed that addition since the preprint. Will take a look and update my post.
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