Twitter | Search | |
Xan Gregg
Software development . Creator of & . , , . Views my own.
1,841
Tweets
935
Following
807
Followers
Tweets
Xan Gregg retweeted
Anthony Starks Sep 19
FYI, the constantly updated collection of DuBois recreations are here:
Reply Retweet Like
Xan Gregg Sep 19
I really liked the 's call to using lessons from Statistical Process Control for dashboard thresholds.
Reply Retweet Like
Xan Gregg Sep 17
Thanks for sharing insightful research on Bias in AI at meetup, sponsored by .
Reply Retweet Like
Xan Gregg Sep 17
Replying to @AlexSelbyB
Wish they would include a "lines not proportional to values" note if they're not going to explain the square-root scaling.
Reply Retweet Like
Xan Gregg Sep 15
Couldn't make out the logic of the bar heights in this Notre Dame lead , so I measured the pixels and tried a few mappings. Looks like a square root scale -- here are those values on a transformed axis.
Reply Retweet Like
Xan Gregg Sep 12
Giving my poster one more appearance, at the NC ASA chapter's recycled poster session.
Reply Retweet Like
Xan Gregg retweeted
Arati Mejdal Sep 12
After the dashboards event with yesterday, I'm reading excerpts from his upcoming book called Beyond Dashboards. Wanna read them too?
Reply Retweet Like
Xan Gregg Sep 11
Great to meet my co-author () in person at dinner last night. His dashboard webcast is today.
Reply Retweet Like
Xan Gregg Sep 11
Replying to @danz_68
The Wilkinson quote seemed ironic at first since his book, *The* Grammar of Graphics, creates a taxonomy of chart elements, such as those you mention. However, I think the quote and the discussion are more about taxonomies for whole charts.
Reply Retweet Like
Xan Gregg Sep 10
Cool surprise to see the examples I made of two different kinds of "dot plots" included in this interesting article, "Pros and Cons of Chart Taxonomies".
Reply Retweet Like
Xan Gregg Sep 6
Replying to @AlexSelbyB
Thanks! It's a nice correction to my usual thinking that a book/paper from even 10 years ago is outdated.
Reply Retweet Like
Xan Gregg Sep 6
Replying to @maartenzam
So does "beeswarm" now mean any kind of packed dodging and not just the ordered dodging from the beeswarm package? Sounds good to me -- I don't like the artificial smiley patterns/tendrils.
Reply Retweet Like
Xan Gregg Sep 4
With these two early books coincidentally on my desk together, I just noticed how similar the cover art is. John Tukey's Exploratory Data Analysis, 1975, and Mary Spear's Practical Charting Techniques, 1969.
Reply Retweet Like
Xan Gregg Sep 3
Replying to @IvettAlexa
Yes. Well written and organized. Lots of real relevant visuals made by Spear herself. Timeless advice based on decades of experience. But also plenty of dated production techniques.
Reply Retweet Like
Xan Gregg Sep 2
Replying to @ckingstats @Sjkal and 2 others
Given that the cone doesn't seem to be going away, flattening the rounded top might help (making it look less like a hurricane).
Reply Retweet Like
Xan Gregg Sep 2
Spear's earlier book, Charting Statistics, has a lot of the same content and can be viewed online at .
Reply Retweet Like
Xan Gregg Sep 2
The title Practical Charting Techniques is very fitting. Often she will say, here is the rule and here are situations where you might need to break the rule. And there is plenty of detail on the techniques of making charts.
Reply Retweet Like
Xan Gregg Sep 2
Part of her goal was to establish names for charts, though many were not so timeless, such as "cosmograph", but I think "more-or-less" should make a comeback for any low-precision chart.
Reply Retweet Like
Xan Gregg Sep 2
This "ranking chart" looks like an early slope chart.
Reply Retweet Like
Xan Gregg Sep 2
On pie charts: "The pie chart ... should be used sparingly, especially when there are many components. It is not only difficult to compare area segments accurately, but difficult to label them properly."
Reply Retweet Like