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Xan Gregg
Software development . Creator of & . , , . Views my own.
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Xan Gregg 8h
Replying to @wisevis
Thanks. Interesting, indeed, and nice catch. They don't call you "wisevis" for nothing!
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Xan Gregg 8h
Replying to @xangregg
My thinking is that bars invite absolute comparisons such as 2x, more than dots or lines, which is problematic with non-linear scales and non-zeroed scales.
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Xan Gregg 8h
Replying to @danz_68
That's all I know. Maybe you can drive up to Berlin and ask. 😀
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Xan Gregg 8h
Replying to @wisevis
I see the log bars in the first edition -- what does 2e say?
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Xan Gregg 9h
Is there any collected wisdom for bar charts on log scales? Seems in conflict with the need for a meaningful baseline (zero is impossible), but they continue to be used in respected sources like this TVCG paper:
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Xan Gregg Oct 20
Hadn't tried it, but here are a couple quick ones of the top 25 (out of 102) responses. #1 is ordered by avg frequency -- #2 by female frequency. It does make labeling easier (no collisions).
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Xan Gregg Oct 20
Replying to @danz_68
Something like this? Not kde, of course, and sloppier labeling. Now the slope lines can be thick enough to work against grid lines. Adjustments possible for color and show-line thresholds.
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Xan Gregg Oct 20
Replying to @danz_68
I agree on the coloring, and I like the #3 labeling for highlighting the gender differences. I'm a little worried the labels pull too much attention, allowing a reader to overlook that "new cultures" is tops for males, too, but it's not a compelling worry.
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Xan Gregg Oct 20
Replying to @evergreendata
I'm stuck pointlessly wondering about the premise. Should it compare the demographics of Congress with all of America or with the demographics of people eligible for Congress (25+ years old)? Over 55 of Eligible is more like 38%.
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Xan Gregg Oct 20
Three alternatives of my slope graph of travel motivation survey responses, suggested by . 1. Labeled on right side. 2. Labeled on both sides. 3. Labeled on higher side.
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Xan Gregg Oct 20
Here's a packed bar chart of the motivation-for-travel survey data. I posted my recoded version of the freeform responses on github. See travel_motivation_recoded_stacked.csv at
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Xan Gregg Oct 19
Replying to @briandvickers
I tried that, but when he just repeated his assertion, I figured it was more of a troll situation.
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Xan Gregg Oct 19
Got some real shade/trolling after posting this slope chart to reddit: "The lines between categorical features is a huge no-no. This is just a bad implementation of poor techniques overall."
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Xan Gregg Oct 17
Playing with travel survey data from /r/dataisbeautiful battle. Cleaned up the free-text "motivation" field into 102 values (sometimes multiple per respondent) and made a slope chart comparing rates across gender.
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Xan Gregg retweeted
JMP Software Oct 15
How much of Americans' religiosity might be explained by another factor, like ruralness?
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Xan Gregg Oct 16
New blog post based on my twitter thread exploring religiosity outliers using a Cauchy fitter:
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Xan Gregg Oct 14
Nice map/cartogram, too.
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Xan Gregg Oct 14
What I meant to say! Thanks.
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Xan Gregg Oct 14
Replying to @FanninQED
Thanks! Simple web captures for the data. Census urbanization data: . Gallup religiosity data:
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Xan Gregg Oct 14
Replying to @xangregg
5/4 While I thought the Cauchy fitting and residuals mapping techniques were worth sharing, don't read too much into the results: the two variables are from different sources, and the ruralness of the actual Gallup responders is unknown.
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