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Xan Gregg
Software development . Creator of & . , , . Views my own.
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Xan Gregg 10h
Replying to @maartenzam
If you're looking at how well your progress indicator is predicting completion time, you might plot predicted completion against actual time.
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Xan Gregg 10h
I think what means (also my first thought) is a connected scatterplot with time on both axes and sequenced by some value, such as distance. Imagine times of two relay teams with a point at every 5 meters. But overlaid lines on shared scales seem better.
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Xan Gregg Apr 22
A nice feature of is forking or remixing notebooks. I just need some text like below to import my notebook with new data and parameters to produce a new packed bar chart:
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Xan Gregg Apr 21
Starting to get a packed bar chart working on using D3js:
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Xan Gregg Apr 18
Round 1A results are out for 2019. Just missed advancing! At least there's another chance with Round 1B.
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Xan Gregg Apr 17
Great p-hacking talk at meet-up by . He has lots of great stats videos at and on youtube. Thanks for hosting, .
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Xan Gregg Apr 11
Replying to @amuellerml
If you're agile enough you can get dynamic views by flipping the pages thanks to the miniature corner graphs.
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Xan Gregg Apr 7
Made it through yesterday's qualifying round and wrote up a quick blog post on it (first post since 2017).
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Xan Gregg Apr 6
I see packed bar charts used most often as a scaled up Pareto chart. Here are both animated together as the number of values scales from 8 to 200.
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Xan Gregg Apr 5
The graph makeover at revealed an inconsistency in the Wikipedia source table (now fixed). kindly attributed it to data entry error but the history shows it was case of :
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Xan Gregg Apr 5
Replying to @jbaysdon @aratimejdal
I figured it out! Remembered while falling asleep last night that there was a toilet running which I didn't hear with the laundry going. cc
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Xan Gregg Apr 4
Replying to @jbaysdon
Still a mystery to me, too!
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Xan Gregg Apr 4
Replying to @aratimejdal
As far as we can remember, laundry was the only real water use. We were washing bedding then, so I can only guess the comforter caused the washer to go crazy. Will keep an eye on it next time.
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Xan Gregg Apr 4
Replying to @xangregg
Here's the hourly data around that March 30 spike. Looks like it was mostly in one hour! I remember some spring cleaning going on, but not that concentrated.
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Xan Gregg Apr 4
My new water meter takes hourly readings and supports CSV download. Yay! I charted my 2019 data summarized by day. Weekly-ish spikes are laundry days, I think. Not sure what happened on March 30.
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Xan Gregg Apr 4
Replying to @xangregg
And the reverse Equal Earth projection requires an iterative solver. Not terrible, but doesn't seem to fit with the unconditional claim in the abstract.
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Xan Gregg Apr 4
Small complaint about paper: abstract (and now Wikipedia) says it's "simple to implement and fast to evaluate" but many are simpler and faster. Paper body hardly mentions performance (only comparing to Eckert IV).
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Xan Gregg Mar 26
Replying to @jonasoesch
Nice time series/bar chart combination. (fyi typo for gulf war)
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Xan Gregg Mar 20
Some great insights on identifying unhelpful outliers and redundant features, stacking models, reproducibility and more.
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Xan Gregg Mar 19
Replying to @danz_68
Interesting. The cost is high in total pixels and time to view, but the resolution is also high -- easy to see every data value and label. Harder to compare across time. Made a quick log scale line chart to help appreciate the trade-offs.
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