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Xan Gregg
Software development . Creator of & . , , . Views my own.
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Xan Gregg 10h
A word cloud about clouds at the Montreal Biosphere Environment Museum.
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Xan Gregg 12h
Nice little detail in this Montreal metro map. The thick line corresponds to the direction and line of the platform where the map is.
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Xan Gregg Jun 20
Replying to @alxrdk @lisacrost
Great write-up, Lisa, I had similar thoughts doing my remakes: one or two readings outside the "normal" range is not unusual.
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Xan Gregg Jun 19
Replying to @alxrdk @P_Graichen
The distribution is skewed enough that σ may not be great to represent variation, but here's a quick version with mean and +/-2σ (over the entire time period). Btw, my collected data is at
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Xan Gregg Jun 19
Replying to @alxrdk @P_Graichen
Sorry -- that was Google Translate. I got that you were highlighting the danger of focusing on daily values, and wanted to make sure you saw the cumulative alternative.
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Xan Gregg Jun 19
Here's a try at de-noising the Greenland surface melt historical context: using 5 days of data for each quantile. Mine in red, original in blue. Now I'm more worried about the bigger Q: is interdecile range the best context?
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Xan Gregg Jun 19
I'm headed to Montreal this afternoon for a few days of unstructured time. Any events/destinations/people to look for?
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Xan Gregg Jun 19
Replying to @alxrdk @P_Graichen
Vielleicht gefällt Ihnen die kumulative Version besser.
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Xan Gregg Jun 19
Replying to @nyalldawson
gray vs grey?
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Xan Gregg Jun 18
Seems like a good time to share this photo of Greenland I took a few years ago on a flight back from Brussels. The terrain was very striking.
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Xan Gregg Jun 18
Replying to @xangregg
My uploaded data includes interpolated values for missing days and a separate flag column indicating which rows were interpolated (in case you only want to work with the raw data).
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Xan Gregg Jun 18
Replying to @xangregg
I tried to account for the missing days with interpolation, as the nsidc chart did for its variation bands. In the early years, the measurements were made every other day (to save satellite battery).
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Xan Gregg Jun 18
I don't know if cumulative melt area makes sense physically, but it's one way to smooth out the daily variation. Amazing difference between final sums of the early years and recent years.
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Xan Gregg Jun 18
Replying to @xangregg
Oops -- that should be "NSIDC": National Snow and Ice Data Center
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Xan Gregg Jun 18
I've uploaded the daily Greenland melt totals from the NSICD chart to . Though I want to experiment with the variation bands, here's the raw spaghetti plot for starters.
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Xan Gregg Jun 18
Since looking for Greenland surface melt data I've found: - Daily melt totals since 1979 via this graph's JSON files - Recent data by geotile is not yet available via . - Cool stuff at via
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Xan Gregg Jun 18
Replying to @robertstats
You can see all the years you want (and a few days after the spike this year) in this interactive version
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Xan Gregg Jun 17
Replying to @lenkiefer
I keep reading the curves as being in the time dimension like the bars are. Was there a trick to get past that or does it come naturally?
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Xan Gregg Jun 17
I'd guess this particular particular data layout is not making good use of those features then. The 1.9MB HDF5 file came down to 71KB as CSV, mostly because all the non-Greenland data was included and the many dups didn't get compressed.
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Xan Gregg Jun 17
Replying to @hrbrmstr
If there's any defense for sizing bubbles with radius proportion to measure, it surely can't include this part-to-whole case.
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