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Wojtek Kopczuk
Economist, I work on tax policy and/or inequality. Editor of J. of Public Economics. Professional skeptic. If vowels are missing, the tweet is in Polish.
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Wojtek Kopczuk 6h
I'm sympathetic to the existence of externalities due to political power, but at this point this is not economics - I don't know of empirical evidence of it and they didn't cite any (and what's in PSS is far from what passes for acceptable evidence). It's a political statement.
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Wojtek Kopczuk 8h
Replying to @arpitrage
Future researchers might still read it off ice cores or trash deposits
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Wojtek Kopczuk 8h
We all need to learn to increase productivity of our vacationing
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Wojtek Kopczuk 8h
I have a dishwasher, so the only time I ever watch something longer than 5 minutes is on a bike trainer
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Wojtek Kopczuk 9h
I thought that 's work showed that part of the solution in music was bundling (with live performances; incidentally, pre-technological approach). Is there an analogue for news?
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Wojtek Kopczuk 14h
Bread in the US is an example that negative technological progress is possible
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Wojtek Kopczuk 15h
The moment I read about what's happening in Venezuela, I wondered how long it is going to take the faction-that-hates-toilet-paper-for-all to comment. It took mere minutes.
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Wojtek Kopczuk 16h
Yes, all of them. Wealth tax? In practice, imposed on easy to observe assets (housing, stocks, bank accounts) with breaks for hard to value businesses. So, a middle class tax. Income tax? As rates go up, lots of avoidance opportunities at the very top, but not for wage earners
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Wojtek Kopczuk retweeted
Wojtek Kopczuk Jan 22
Developed economies in the 1970s (pre Reagan/Thatcher) were
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Wojtek Kopczuk Jan 22
No denying that, though there is a big step from intolerance (even aggressive one) to state fascism
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Wojtek Kopczuk Jan 22
I don't think that's fair. It was undemocratic, though with pretenses, and there was political oppression but all of it a far cry from Germany and our fascists were not in power
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Wojtek Kopczuk Jan 22
Great recession of course...
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Wojtek Kopczuk Jan 22
Replying to @arindube
Looking forward to hear what Amherstian libertarians came up with!
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Wojtek Kopczuk Jan 22
There was not even a recession in Poland during the Great Depression. There is a social/cultural/nationalistic base that is big enough to sometimes grow to majority if other things align. The last "shock" was mainly the previous government wearing out + some economic anxiety
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Wojtek Kopczuk Jan 22
Polish politics is bad but not dramatically different than everywhere else in Europe
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Wojtek Kopczuk Jan 22
Law and Justice got 37.58% of votes in 2015, 16% went to parties that didn't cross the 5% threshold. This was enough for them to get majority under proportional system (with 51% turnout). That after 8 years of pro-European government, that drifted into mediocrity
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Wojtek Kopczuk Jan 22
Replying to @ikuziemko @jmhorp and 4 others
And as much as dislike what's been happening, the "turn to autocracy" is only a bit different than what's been happening in the US - it's been less than one term and I am not worried as of now whether the next election will be free (though I am not sure of the outcome)
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Wojtek Kopczuk Jan 22
Replying to @ikuziemko @jmhorp and 4 others
Not too early to evaluate economic performance over 1989-2018, that's a pretty long term. The current government aggressively pursues social spending and public interventions in the name of "national interest" - that is a reversal of policies of the last 30 years
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Wojtek Kopczuk Jan 22
But lower progressivity and shift to kleptocracy happened at the same time. How do you separate that? They seem to imply that lack of progressivity is responsible for kleptocracy, but that's inconsistent with experience elsewhere in Central and Eastern Europe
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Wojtek Kopczuk Jan 22
Then what does it have to do then with their case for progressivity?
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