Twitter | Search | |
Wojtek Kopczuk
Economist, I work on tax policy and/or inequality. Editor of J. of Public Economics. Professional skeptic. If vowels are missing, the tweet is in Polish.
2,465
Tweets
310
Following
1,624
Followers
Tweets
Wojtek Kopczuk 4h
Replying to @TimHarford
"Reviews" could be included as #51 in the next edition!
Reply Retweet Like
Wojtek Kopczuk 4h
I agree with the sentiment, but if it's ok to call the US "market-fundamendalist" with 2/3 of federal expenditures on various forms of social insurance (and that still ignores tax expenditures), then why isn't it ok to make similarly extreme statements on the other side?
Reply Retweet Like
Wojtek Kopczuk 18h
That is a realistic solution for NYC - avenues + wide cross streets (like Houston, 14th or 23rd) open to traffic and traffic-free side streets. Still not perfect for biking but better than what we have
Reply Retweet Like
Wojtek Kopczuk 18h
And then, kids, they ended profits by turning them into losses.
Reply Retweet Like
Wojtek Kopczuk 19h
My impression (perhaps wrong) is that such areas are not that large and with enough access roads to make them easily accessible from streets with traffic. Also, probably not high density residential
Reply Retweet Like
Wojtek Kopczuk 19h
Replying to @johnjhorton @arindube
What I want is an underground conveyer belt system that will take packages to a point of my choosing elsewhere in the city. I'll go there myself by bike
Reply Retweet Like
Wojtek Kopczuk 19h
Replying to @johnjhorton @arindube
Midtown - yes. But what do you do with places that have a lot of residential population (like, say, east/west village)? Emergencies or heavy luggage (to airport or to your own car parked elsewhere) etc. become issues
Reply Retweet Like
Wojtek Kopczuk 20h
Replying to @johnjhorton @arindube
Interesting, but even congestion charges would likely (1) eliminate most private traffic and (2) as the result, eliminate most of the need for parking. #2 would make it much easier to reclaim streets for bike lanes or other uses and all the garages would flow to better uses
Reply Retweet Like
Wojtek Kopczuk 20h
Right, we would need more doctors in a free market world where government doesn't make it possible to have mandatory occupational licensing
Reply Retweet Like
Wojtek Kopczuk 21h
Is there any reason to believe that supply of students is an issue? It is the cartel on the other side of the market that restricts entry
Reply Retweet Like
Wojtek Kopczuk 23h
You guys just know nothing about what it takes to run a business! American prosperity has been built by used car dealerships
Reply Retweet Like
Wojtek Kopczuk Aug 14
Replying to @marthagimbel
Honest mistake, hard to tell apart:
Reply Retweet Like
Wojtek Kopczuk Aug 14
Replying to @marthagimbel
Oops
Reply Retweet Like
Wojtek Kopczuk Aug 14
Count the number of car dealers in Congress - it's the quintessential "small business" favored nowadays. It also helps in understanding the reason for the massive pass-through tax provision
Reply Retweet Like
Wojtek Kopczuk Aug 13
Replying to @sht123sht
Nothing is perfect. They are definitely responsible for the institutions that constrain him though
Reply Retweet Like
Wojtek Kopczuk Aug 13
Lenin good, Stalin bad revisited as usual. Just a thought: if you want government in, you are also responsible for consequences when circumstances and people in charge change
Reply Retweet Like
Wojtek Kopczuk Aug 13
Oh yeah, I should've remembered that paper!
Reply Retweet Like
Wojtek Kopczuk Aug 13
Not sure about research, but the notion that a tax that you can do nothing about is hated rings true (assuming that it is salient)
Reply Retweet Like
Wojtek Kopczuk Aug 13
Replying to @D_Langenmayr @APeichl
You mean because of the participation margin? Otherwise, not obvious. In a nonlinear tax system, a marginal tax at the bottom effectively increases tax liability at all higher incomes - that's the Mirrlees logic for high rates at the bottom
Reply Retweet Like
Wojtek Kopczuk Aug 13
Zero is unlikely to optimal in the Ramsey world - strong restriction on preferences. But you can have taxes or subsidies, either can be optimal. That becomes clearer once you consider switching normalization (which good is not taxed) - positive/negative rates are relative to that
Reply Retweet Like