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Dr Hazel Jackson
Science Director . Associate . Evolutionary conservation geneticist, with a particular love of parrots. Views are my own.
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Dr Hazel Jackson retweeted
Patrick Barkham 21h
Great news! Congratulations everyone who campaigned to save Lodge Hill and its nightingales.
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Dr Hazel Jackson retweeted
🦜 Parrot Of The Day 🗓 23h
Origins of the UK’s rose-ringed parakeets are a matter of wild conjecture (even Jimi Hendrix has been blamed), but flocks began with escaped or released captive birds, i.e. they didn’t fly there from Africa or India. They’re also found in several other cities in Europe.
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Dr Hazel Jackson 19h
Indeed I am! And always happy to answer questions 🦜🤓
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Dr Hazel Jackson 19h
☺️🦜🦜🦜🦜
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Dr Hazel Jackson 22h
Wow! ‘92% of animal experiments fail at human clinical trials’!
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Dr Hazel Jackson retweeted
🦜 Parrot Of The Day 🗓 Dec 12
13 December: Red-crowned amazon (Amazona viridigenalis), native to NE Mexico and (possibly) SE Texas, USA. Critically endangered due to extensive trapping and export, combined with habitat loss. Pic in Brownsville, Texas, by Isaac Sanchez
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Dr Hazel Jackson Dec 12
😡😡😡
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Dr Hazel Jackson retweeted
🦜 Parrot Of The Day 🗓 Dec 11
Yellow-collared lovebirds (Agapornis personatus), Tarangire National Park, Tanzania. Pic by Kevin Vande Vusse via
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Dr Hazel Jackson Dec 12
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Dr Hazel Jackson retweeted
Grant Taylor Dec 11
We’re really proud to share our brand new report on Leadership: How can we lead differently in the 21st Century to accelerate social change.
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Dr Hazel Jackson retweeted
Cairngorms Nature Dec 8
An insight into some of the amazing, ground breaking ecological restoration work going on in the
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Dr Hazel Jackson retweeted
American Museum of Natural History Dec 9
Wondering how the Military Macaw got its name? It was given to the bird by Carl Linnaeus, the zoologist who developed the modern system of classifying organisms, who thought the species’s bright red patches resembled details on the uniforms of Prussian soldiers.
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Dr Hazel Jackson retweeted
Simon Tollington Dec 9
This is a great opportunity. I had the privilege of working in this role shortly after I finished my PhD. I have very fond memories of it and am still in contact with many of the inspiring students who are now doing some great conservation work all over the world!
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Dr Hazel Jackson Dec 9
Yes I also did my PhD at the same time, also on ring-necked parakeets :-)
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Dr Hazel Jackson retweeted
Dr Hazel Jackson Dec 4
Fancy hearing me talk about my reseatch on our charismatic ringnecked parakeets? Well you can. I’m on YouTube! 😁
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Dr Hazel Jackson Dec 9
they are high on the list for our London peregrines favorite meal. I doubt they will make much of a dent in such a large and growing parakeet population tho.
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Dr Hazel Jackson Dec 9
Is it huge though? No studies on this in the UK.
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Dr Hazel Jackson Dec 9
They will be soon. We now have breeding pops as far north as Glasgow. We are seeing a lot of spread around the whole country.
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Dr Hazel Jackson Dec 9
There are wayyyyy more than 8,000. It’s well over 30,000 at the last count in 2010.
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Dr Hazel Jackson Dec 7
This is possibly the best thing I’ve read in AGES. Increase your publication rate by ‘rejecting the rejection’
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