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pdjmoo 17 Sep 18
Replying to @wef
Still doesn’t address the final disposal of the no matter how many times you repurpose it nor does it take into account the toxic plastic chemical runoff into the soil and groundwater when it rains..and it does rain in ~
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Y 17 Sep 18
Replying to @wef
WILT: melting point for plastic roads is around 66°C, compared to 50°C for conventional roads.
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Prigith Joseph 17 Sep 18
Replying to @wef @moefcc
Great idea
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Jonny Axelsson 17 Sep 18
Replying to @wef
Question is not only the plastic consumption, but how to prevent it from going to the sea in the first place. The answer to that can differ greatly from place to place. In Norway the greatest source may be car tyre particles worn off by the road and washed to sea by the rain.
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Jonny Axelsson 17 Sep 18
Replying to @wef
Notably, not only there, plastic bottles and bags are just a small part of the total amount (and bottles can very efficiently be recycled). It would be ironic if plastic fished from the sea would be washed from the road and then put back into the road.
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