Twitter | Search | |
John Burn-Murdoch 17 Jul 19
🙌🙌 totally agree. And we know from research that when people 'read' a chart, they read it as an overall message, not as precise values. In most news graphics cases, I'd say narrative legend > scientific legend.
Reply Retweet Like
Maarten Lambrechts 17 Jul 19
I agree to some degree, but this also opens the door for deceiving graphics
Reply Retweet Like
John Burn-Murdoch 17 Jul 19
How so?
Reply Retweet Like
Christian Endt 🇪🇺 17 Jul 19
I'm sceptical. Dropping the legend allows to make such a map out of very small differences in the data. You should provide at least min and max values to give a sense of the distribution. If people don't look so close –fine, but they should be able to find out.
Reply Retweet Like
John Burn-Murdoch 17 Jul 19
Depends on the case imo. Here, I'm not sure any value of pills per person would be meaningful to a reader, so it really is all about relative values, which a legend- free scale conveys perfectly well.
Reply Retweet Like
John Burn-Murdoch 17 Jul 19
More broadly, it always comes down to the underlying intellectual honesty. It's always our job to be honest, fair and robust with the data. If we get that right, stripping back technical details to focus on overall message clarity is simply following Rosling's golden rule.
Reply Retweet Like
Maarten Lambrechts 17 Jul 19
Yes, but we can only see that you are honest if you give us the legend
Reply Retweet Like
John Burn-Murdoch 17 Jul 19
Would the climate warming stripes be better with a legend? No further questions, your honour.
Reply Retweet Like
Andy Kirk 17 Jul 19
I’d side with John on this. I don’t see the warming stripes as being likely intended to be read as much as ‘felt’. I’d consider them to be exhibitory pieces in nature, with general perceiving of roughly how 🥵 <—-> 🥶 sufficient and this is achievable to any viewer without a key
Reply Retweet Like
Alberto Cairo 17 Jul 19
You can feel them the same way with a tiny legend as a footnote. And the subset of readers who'd like to check some details can do that. Everybody benefits
Reply Retweet Like
Andy Kirk
I’d agree that in many places, where the warming stripes charts are published you SHOULD have that annotation. However, in some of the ways they are experienced by many people they exist more as artistic assets (gifs, textiles, scarves) and so feel you can make a case to remove.
Reply Retweet Like More
Alberto Cairo 17 Jul 19
Oh, sure, I agree. I was referring more generally to the graphic published as an informative device
Reply Retweet Like
John Burn-Murdoch 17 Jul 19
There's some more great material for your future podcast here, Andy
Reply Retweet Like
John Burn-Murdoch 17 Jul 19
Yeah this part of my thinking, too. The flexibility of a flat image is one of its big selling points.
Reply Retweet Like