Twitter | Search | |
vijay iyer
Music maker, professor, Harlem resident. Rhymes with "big grey tire." FAR FROM OVER, our new album on :
21,356
Tweets
13,928
Following
28,020
Followers
Tweets
vijay iyer 6h
NEW YORK: Join us at this week! June 25-29 with a bunch of my favorite people. Co-hosted by
Reply Retweet Like
vijay iyer retweeted
Rep. Pramila Jayapal Jun 23
I went inside the detention center again. Again, men and women broke down in tears speaking of their families, and they described fleeing terrible violence, rape and trauma. Nearly all want asylum. I promised we would keep fighting to defeat this cruelty and get them released.
Reply Retweet Like
vijay iyer retweeted
Nell Painter Jun 23
Some actual facts about migration, including about crime and work. "Migrants Are on the Rise Around the World, and Myths About Them Are Shaping Attitudes"
Reply Retweet Like
vijay iyer retweeted
Rep. Pramila Jayapal Jun 23
Great discussion with this morning getting to the root causes of what is really going on. Donald Trump and the GOP are deliberately whipping up fear and racism, harkening to some of the most shameful and disastrous episodes of the 20th century.
Reply Retweet Like
vijay iyer retweeted
Amy Siskind Jun 22
Scribing Week 84 is just devastating. Generations from now will mark this week as the moment Americans realized we were losing our county as we have known it.
Reply Retweet Like
vijay iyer Jun 23
Replying to @IBJIYONGI
Okay, I am sorry!
Reply Retweet Like
vijay iyer Jun 23
Replying to @IBJIYONGI
But my point is only that there is a pattern in American cinema that normalizes mass death in general, just like American culture has in general, and I am trying to understand it, while also being an ongoing consumer of it. 🤷🏾‍♂️
Reply Retweet Like
vijay iyer Jun 23
Replying to @IBJIYONGI
It’s really not a cinematic comparison, I swear. But I do know plenty of Black folks who saw Django, and of course people went in knowing full well what the deal was. It screened here in Harlem at Magic Johnson just like all the aforementioned films. Folks shouted at the screen.
Reply Retweet Like
vijay iyer Jun 23
Replying to @IBJIYONGI
Wouldn’t you say that there is overlap between audiences for Django and Black Panther? I’m not defending QT just by mentioning him!
Reply Retweet Like
vijay iyer Jun 23
Replying to @IBJIYONGI
Movie tickets are all sold in the same place, and they all screen in the same place, to many of the same viewers. I don’t know if the integrity of an auteur’s oeuvre holds up in that swirl of culture. But I am not really trying to say either way. I’m just thinking about death?
Reply Retweet Like
vijay iyer Jun 23
Replying to @IBJIYONGI
But American cinema is not morally separate from American genocide either. MCU is able to traffic in such images of mass death because it exists in the American cinematic universe with Star Wars and westerns. It doesn’t dwell in some separate ethical realm, does it?
Reply Retweet Like
vijay iyer Jun 23
Replying to @IBJIYONGI
And I put Django in an adjacent category, which is blatantly milking mass suffering for pulpy cinematic enjoyment. When I saw it I posted on FB, “Coming soon: Tarantino’s 9/11”
Reply Retweet Like
vijay iyer Jun 23
Replying to @IBJIYONGI
But those are movies about genocide. People go to them in full knowledge of that (though also promising redemption through individual characters). I’m talking about action/adventure/swashbuckler movies that sell a certain thrill factor, and sideswipe you with mass death for “fun”
Reply Retweet Like
vijay iyer Jun 23
Replying to @IBJIYONGI
Yes. The sheer pessimism was brave. As to whether it was meant for entertainment or not, as I see it, nobody controls that. Feelings just get stuck to moments in cinema, regardless of “intent” (which is already scattered across dozens of people on a creative team).
Reply Retweet Like
vijay iyer Jun 23
Replying to @IBJIYONGI
I agree. I’m really just looking at what this move does, in a top-grossing global blockbuster, to how “we” (a fragile construction, the intended MCU viewing subject/consumer) ultimately feel about mass death.
Reply Retweet Like
vijay iyer Jun 23
Replying to @IBJIYONGI
I remember when they killed a whole plane full of people in a Die Hard movie some decades ago. It felt genuinely shocking. And honestly the snap also felt shocking - to see that happen in a film that I brought my family to see, with mostly kids in the theater.
Reply Retweet Like
vijay iyer Jun 23
Replying to @IBJIYONGI
Sure— and honestly I am not critiquing the film (which I liked) or the MCU (I’m obviously in deep) — just observing the ever-creeping goal post of how much death in a film is deemed too much death. And I guess we’re at the point where there is no such goalpost anymore.
Reply Retweet Like
vijay iyer Jun 23
Replying to @IBJIYONGI
Sorry, I’ve just been reading too much affect theory and find myself thinking about “structures of feeling” these days.
Reply Retweet Like
vijay iyer Jun 23
Replying to @IBJIYONGI
I’m not suggesting that. If we’re ever able to look back on this era of SF it might be seen as the multiverse period. Multi-scenario thinking is very much about the dilemmas and perils of the present.
Reply Retweet Like
vijay iyer Jun 23
Replying to @IBJIYONGI
I really do agree with all of what you said, about story and metaphor. I’m just trying to think about what depicted genocide feels like, as a recurring pattern in culture, and what it does. Somewhere in here is a paper titled “SNAP: The Relational Aesthetics of CGI Mass Death”
Reply Retweet Like