Twitter | Search | |
Tricia Ebarvia
My son's 9th grade curriculum: Julius Cesar Scarlet Letter The Crucible Count of Monte Cristo ... plus other stuff from a textbook You can probably imagine my reaction right now.
Reply Retweet Like More
Tricia Ebarvia Sep 9
Replying to @triciaebarvia
Friends, I'm struggling. But to be clear: this isn't about any teacher. Ts work in systems. And as a T, I also know most of us do the best we can w/what we know. This is a symptom of something deeper. My next step: collect more information. And take deep breaths.
Reply Retweet Like
Tricia Ebarvia Sep 9
Replying to @Tolerance_org
That said... do feel compelled to add that when I spoke to one of my son's Ts last year about a related issue—it went better than I expected. In fact, there was follow-up and even discussion about 's Teaching Hard History podcast. It was great! So there's that.
Reply Retweet Like
Tricia Ebarvia Sep 10
Replying to @Tolerance_org
But here's the other thing. I'm not necessarily opposed to any one of these texts in particular. I share this not to "bash" SL or Shakespeare—I teach The Crucible!—but in the context of these as a curriculum, as the only texts centered & named on a syllabus? I have questions.
Reply Retweet Like
Julio C Mendez Sep 10
I believe you should speak up. You might be the only parent informed enough to make a case (don’t want to assume anything), however I’ve had to bring up several issues to which I as an active agent of change have background info on some topics other parents aren’t informed abt
Reply Retweet Like
Tricia Ebarvia Sep 10
Thank you 🙏🏽
Reply Retweet Like
Ms. Augustine Sep 9
Replying to @triciaebarvia
I get that the world is filled with new and more relevant text. But classics are “classics” for a reason. They have their place in academia. Truth be told if you aren’t aware of the “old stuff” how will you understand an allusion with it’s presented in the fault in our stars?
Reply Retweet Like
Tricia Ebarvia Sep 9
Replying to @2Augiewitluv
And what abt all the voices in the past that have been marginalized, ignored, forgotten? The label of "classic" isn't always about literary merit as much as it is a reflection of power structures: who had access, connections. Or what abt "classics" that represent other voices?
Reply Retweet Like
Tricia Ebarvia Sep 9
Replying to @2Augiewitluv
I don't believe that just because something is *new* it makes it better or more relevant. I just think that if we are going to have a conversation about "classics" or the "canon" we have to grapple with the fact those labels are not necessarily based on merit either.
Reply Retweet Like
Brigid Howe Sep 9
How about high school English teachers challenge their students to define the canon? Start off by familiarizing themselves with the classics and then students identify their ideal canon and share and challenge each other.
Reply Retweet Like
jennifer phillips Sep 9
Replying to @triciaebarvia
Reply Retweet Like
jennifer phillips Sep 9
Replying to @triciaebarvia
Seriously, though, I read 3 of these 4 back in my super-white, barely urban high school in Amarillo, Texas, between 1989-1991. What the actual hell.
Reply Retweet Like
Tricia Ebarvia Sep 9
Replying to @jennphillipstx
I went to the same HS my son is at now. I read 3 of the 4 back then, too. Sigh.
Reply Retweet Like
Alison Collins 高勵思 Sep 9
This happened to my kids in 7th grade. All white authors (except for one Asian author.) When I asked the Chief Academic Officer if our district had any expectations around this I was met with a blank stare. 😑
Reply Retweet Like
Alison Collins 高勵思 Sep 9
Its why I ran for Board of Education. Policy is the only way to change this stuff. I am introducing a Board Resolution tomorrow for final reading that addresses this issue on a district level. Expecting teachers to make individual choices is not the way to create systemic change.
Reply Retweet Like
Tricia Ebarvia Sep 9
I actually applied for an opening on my district's education committee and was denied. It's okay. I'll find other ways. :)
Reply Retweet Like
Sarah Suggs Sep 9
Replying to @triciaebarvia
Clearly his teacher doesn't know who his momma is! 😆😖
Reply Retweet Like
Tricia Ebarvia Sep 9
Replying to @SarahSuggs13
It shouldn't matter who his momma is, though, right? (And I don't know that people outside of my PLN on here care 😂)
Reply Retweet Like
Sarah Suggs Sep 9
Replying to @triciaebarvia
You're right. It shouldn't matter. But I bet there will be some cringing if/when they learn of the work you do. Seriously, though, how do we nudge our children's schools? It's not a district issue. District leadership has been trying to encourange change.
Reply Retweet Like
Tricia Ebarvia Sep 9
Replying to @SarahSuggs13
I guess my question for those who see no need to change would be this: what would it take to convince you otherwise? what would you need to be convinced? This puts the onus back on them. And for some, nothing will convince them, so at least that's made clear.
Reply Retweet Like
Tolly Salz Sep 9
What does support look like right now, and what can we do to advocate?
Reply Retweet Like