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Taylor R. Genovese 8 Jun 17
He looks kind of ill here—maybe because he was? The whole crew of Apollo 7 got head colds on orbit & ended up being grouchy at Houston.
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Taylor R. Genovese 8 Jun 17
Replying to @trgenovese
The crew even went so far as to insult the intelligence of some mission controllers on open-communication channels!
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Taylor R. Genovese 8 Jun 17
Replying to @trgenovese
Possibly due to this, no crew member of Apollo 7 ever flew in space again. This wasn't the last time a flight crew got "blacklisted" either.
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Taylor R. Genovese
The all-rookie crew of Skylab 4, after discovering they were being secretly monitored & pushed to work 16 hour days mutinied after 6 weeks.
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Taylor R. Genovese 8 Jun 17
Replying to @trgenovese
The first (and only) worker's strike in space didn't come out of the blue—William Pogue tried explaining the crew's issues to Houston.
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Taylor R. Genovese 8 Jun 17
Replying to @trgenovese
Hearing this, mission control, rather confused at these issues—and in typical neoliberal fashion—thought the crew must be lazy or depressed.
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Taylor R. Genovese 8 Jun 17
Replying to @trgenovese
So the crew went on strike for 24 hours, cutting communication with Houston. They took showers, played in microgravity, & studied the sun.
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Taylor R. Genovese 8 Jun 17
Replying to @trgenovese
After the strike, the crew came to Houston with their demands. NASA capitulated to their demands and actually ended up changing policy.
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Taylor R. Genovese 8 Jun 17
Replying to @trgenovese
Policy, in fact, that continues today on the ISS. That is, 10 hour workdays, uninterrupted meal times, and a half-day off on Saturdays.
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Taylor R. Genovese 8 Jun 17
Replying to @trgenovese
So don't ever think that worker strikes don't change policy in favor of the worker's—whether on Earth, or off!
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Taylor R. Genovese 8 Jun 17
Replying to @trgenovese
All power to the workers! Including those bearded comrades that fought for their rights on Skylab! [Gerald Carr (L) & William Pogue (R)]
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Taylor R. Genovese 8 Jun 17
Replying to @trgenovese
Here's some further reading about the Skylab 4 strike.
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Taylor R. Genovese 8 Jun 17
Replying to @trgenovese
Also—as a random side note—the shower in Skylab was both awesome and hilarious. It never could quite contain all the water in microgravity.
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Martin “Lick The Bomb” Pfeiffer🏳️‍🌈 8 Jun 17
Replying to @trgenovese
I thought they just used wet wipes?!? Is this on the ISS too?!? HOW DID THIS EVEN TRY TO WORK?!?
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Taylor R. Genovese 8 Jun 17
Replying to @NuclearAnthro
This was only attempted on Skylab (for a reason lol). ISS uses mainly moist towels because—as Skylab demonstrated—the water gets everywhere.
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Martin “Lick The Bomb” Pfeiffer🏳️‍🌈 8 Jun 17
Replying to @trgenovese
Mainly?
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Taylor R. Genovese 8 Jun 17
Replying to @NuclearAnthro
Astronauts also use water bottles on the ISS to wash hair. This isn't a particularly flattering picture but illustrates non-towel hygiene.
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Taylor R. Genovese 8 Jun 17
Also, here's showing how to wash yourself with water and soap in microgravity!
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Taylor R. Genovese 9 Jun 17
Replying to @trgenovese
A more comprehensive history of the Skylab 4 strike is in my MA thesis. After it publishes to ProQuest, I will share a PDF in this thread!
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Filamena Young 9 Jun 17
Replying to @trgenovese
Coolest thing I've read in months.
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