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Travis Goodspeed
Howdy y'all! In this friendly little tweety-box thread, I'd like to share my new project with you. It's called the GoodWatch, and it will be next month at Shmoocon. 1/n
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Travis Goodspeed Dec 11
Replying to @travisgoodspeed
I began by measuring the pinouts of the LCD and keypad of the Casio 3208 watch module, shown on the right, and cloning them into my own GoodWatch10 PCB on the left. The sticky notes let me distinguish COMMON from SEGMENT pins in the LCD, so that my wiring would be correct. 2/n
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derPeter Dec 11
Replying to @travisgoodspeed
you misspelled 34c3
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Travis Goodspeed Dec 11
Replying to @travisgoodspeed
The CC430F6137 that I chose can't quite control all of the pixels, but with three commons and all available segment pins, I was able to get everything except for the day-of-week pixels in the upper right corner. 3/n
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Travis Goodspeed Dec 11
Replying to @travisgoodspeed
In idle mode, the GoodWatch10 (shown on the left) can easily implement all features of the original Casio. It has ~5 years of battery life, knows days of the week for the next two thousand years, and has a handy RPN calculator. 4/n
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Travis Goodspeed Dec 11
Replying to @travisgoodspeed
It also has a hex editor, because no proper lady or gentleman would be caught in public without one on the wrist. Here the hex editor is diagnosing a clock fault by reading the appropriate register. (Now there's a test case for that, of course.) 5/n
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Travis Goodspeed Dec 11
Replying to @travisgoodspeed
"But Travis," you say, "What about a disassembler? What if you're stuck in an hour-long SCRUM meeting and need to reverse engineer your watch's firmware with pen and paper to retain your own sanity?" An MSP430 disassembler is built-in, of course. 6/n
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Brian Sniffen Dec 11
Replying to @travisgoodspeed
You had me at RPN.
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Travis Goodspeed Dec 11
Replying to @travisgoodspeed
And while the GoodWatch10 was certainly the coolest hex editor watch to wear last month, things can be niftier. In this photo, it a GoodWatch20 is beaconing my callsign to a Yaesu 817 as Morse code. 7/n
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haxorthematrix Dec 11
Replying to @travisgoodspeed
I'd love to get ahold of one of these, but won't likely be at Shmoocon.
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Travis Goodspeed Dec 11
Replying to @travisgoodspeed
This tiny green wire--the only cosmetic blemish of the watch--uses the stainless steel watchband as a random wire antenna. It's not well tuned, but it gets the job done. 8/n
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haxorthematrix Dec 11
Replying to @travisgoodspeed
I even have my source all ready....
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dumby ☀️🦆🌊 Dec 11
Replying to @travisgoodspeed
Is that the GDP Pocket Laptop?
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Travis Goodspeed Dec 11
Replying to @travisgoodspeed
The firmware also includes a serial debug monitor, so after flashing firmware and a codeplug of radio frequencies, you can self-test the device or send and receive packets from the air. 9/n
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Travis Goodspeed Dec 11
Replying to @travisgoodspeed
The radio is based on the same CC1101 core that the GirlTech IMME used, so all the old IMME hacks are portable. My reflexive jammer for P25, Mike Ossmann's iClicker emulator, and Samy's OpenSesame can all be adapted to this platform. 10/n
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Sarah Grant Dec 11
Replying to @travisgoodspeed
well damn
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Travis Goodspeed Dec 11
Replying to @travisgoodspeed
You can't leave the receiver idly receiving in the background for power budget reasons, but otherwise the radio is fully functional. Receive and transmit, everything from CW to 4FSK. 11/n
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