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Keri Wilmot
Toy Expert, Pediatric OT, Digital Content Producer, Expert for , Mom to , Wife to
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Keri Wilmot Aug 31
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Understood Jul 31
Join our next with on Wednesday, 8/21 at 12pm ET. RSVP:
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Keri Wilmot Jul 31
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Claudia Castillo Jul 31
A3 Support parent with strategies to use with child and directly help child
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Understood Jul 31
If your child’s fine motor skills need a little extra help, try these fun activities.
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Keri Wilmot Jul 31
Loving these great ideas to help kids improve their fine motor skills from !
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Keri Wilmot Jul 31
A4 (4 of 4) Teachers and parents should have patience with kids who struggle with fine motor skills. It’s frustrating for kids who can’t do tasks like tie shoelaces. They should offer help to get started and celebrate the success with lots of praise to improve confidence.
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Keri Wilmot Jul 31
A4 (3 of 4) Believe it or not, parents can help improve a child’s fine motor skills by encouraging them to do activities like push-ups, yoga poses and wheelbarrow walking. These activities help to build strength in the hands for fine motor skills.
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Keri Wilmot Jul 31
A4 (2 of 4) Teachers and parents may put a pencil grip on a pencil to help kids refine their grip and use the correct fingers when writing to improve their pencil control.
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Keri Wilmot Jul 31
A4 (1 of 4) Teachers of young children in preschool and Kindergarten can improve a child’s fine motor skills by using shorter, fatter writing tools and markers rather than a regular pencil.
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Understood Jul 31
Q4. What can parents or teachers do to help improve a child's fine motor skills?
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Keri Wilmot Jul 31
A3 (2 of 2) For kids who are not able to complete activities at the same rate as their peers, an occupational therapist can work with the child, through play, to help build strength, improve coordination and practice these challenging skills.
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Keri Wilmot Jul 31
A3 (1 of 2) An occupational therapist watches children use their hands during play and self-care activities, and uses standardized testing to determine whether a child is showing a delay in their fine motor skills.
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Understood Jul 31
Q3. What is the role of an occupational therapist in helping with fine motor skills?
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Keri Wilmot Jul 31
Some great suggestions for parents to help your child who struggles with motor skills from !
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Keri Wilmot Jul 31
Replying to @MHcastilloPK
Yes! Thanks for joining us for our fine motor skills !
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Keri Wilmot Jul 31
A2 (3 of 3) Parents can talk to their child’s pediatrician and their teacher if they suspect a fine motor issue to determine if they should get an occupational therapy evaluation and see if they qualify to get some extra help at home or school.
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Keri Wilmot Jul 31
A2 (2 of 3) Fine motor issues could be an issue if the child is asking for help to do a lot of activities kids their age should be able to do on their own related to writing, using scissors and daily living skills like dressing and eating.
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Keri Wilmot Jul 31
A2 (1 of 3) If parents suspect fine motor challenges, they should continue to observe their child doing activities with their hands to get more info. Do they shake their hands when writing from fatigue? Can they rotate items in their fingertips without dropping them?
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Understood Jul 31
Q2. What should parents do if they suspect fine motor skills challenges?
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