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Tim Sneath
Group Product Manager for Flutter and Dart. |
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Tim Sneath 19h
Thank you once again for your latest feedback. We have the results of the 10th quarterly survey, with lots of fascinating data about how you're using Flutter. New learnings -> product improvements.
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Tim Sneath Oct 19
Replying to @deltakosh
I just played A Short Hike this weekend and had a blast. It took a couple of hours to complete, and it felt like the perfect length. I didn't at all resent spending $8 for a movie-length experience. Wish there were more games of this length and quality.
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Tim Sneath retweeted
Matt Carroll Oct 14
"...Flutter, it is the Netflix that Blockbuster laughed over."
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Tim Sneath Oct 14
I skimmed through the chapters that are available so far, and this looks like it's going to be an excellent primer for new Flutter developers. Nice work, team!
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Tim Sneath Oct 14
Replying to @djbaskin
Looks like my Apple survived better than your apple :)
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Tim Sneath Oct 14
You are the true stars ⭐⭐⭐! Thank you to all 104,731 of you who have propelled to be one of the most loved open source projects on . The sky _is_ the limit, as Flutter continues to grow in monthly users, apps, packages. Thank you! /via
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Tim Sneath Oct 14
Replying to @zacbowden
I'm genuinely a bit confused why Microsoft is still migrating stuff from the old Control Panel to the UWP Settings dialog. It takes more time to make these changes than most people appreciate, but still -- it's TEN YEARS and counting since this journey started with Windows 8.
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Tim Sneath retweeted
Carlo Lucera (HatDroid) 💙 Oct 13
I Have successfully cloned Angry Birds using , no lines of code needed. (No dash were really harmed, not sure for the pig.)
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Tim Sneath Oct 13
Replying to @jeffwilcox
The real version is slightly worse, because there was probably also a 1:1, a monthly report, a dashboard to complete. Managers: create oxygen for your reports to "do" rather than "report"!
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Tim Sneath Oct 13
Replying to @jeffwilcox
Week 1: Alice - Meeting today to figure out our strategy for X. Bharat - I'll start a doc. Week 2: Charles - Let's meet for a status update. Bharat - Status: working on the doc. Week 3: Denise - How's X? Bharat - Sorry, been back-to-back in meetings. Still working on doc.
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Tim Sneath Oct 13
Replying to @Anyware
Great to hear from you, Mike! We should catch up some time (at a distance of no less than six feet!)
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Tim Sneath Oct 12
The facial expressions are a perfect example of anthropomorphism. This is exactly how I imagine my computer's emotional state when it fails to find the device that is inches away.
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Tim Sneath Oct 12
They're relatively easy to find -- in addition to the iMac, I was able to buy a brand new one a while back, which I actually use as my main keyboard attached to my 'real', modern computer. Model A1048 is what you're looking for.
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Tim Sneath Oct 11
Replying to @timsneath
/thread
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Tim Sneath Oct 11
Replying to @timsneath
By comparison, today's devices are slabs of machined aluminum and display panels. Functional? Certainly, but missing the whimsicality of these older machines. I miss that personality. There's not much JOY in today's MacBook or iPhone. Hoping that we can see a return soon...
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Tim Sneath Oct 11
Replying to @timsneath
There's a reason why this computer is at the MoMA. It's a design classic, and deserves its place there for decades to come: .
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Tim Sneath Oct 11
Replying to @timsneath
I'm pretty sure that if they sold a Mac like this with modern components, she'd be first in line. And of course, with today's SoC hardware, a Jonathan Ive could craft something even closer to a Platonic ideal for this design.
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Tim Sneath Oct 11
Replying to @timsneath
2. It's also noticeable how innovative this iMac is from a design standpoint. My eldest daughter was born a year after this computer went on sale. I should have recorded her comments as she saw it. "It's sooo cute... why don't they make computers like this anymore?"
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Tim Sneath Oct 11
Replying to @timsneath
2.66GHz CPU, 8GB RAM, 320GB HDD, Gigabit Ethernet, 8GB RAM, 5GHz wireless -- that's a spec you could probably pick up in Walmart today. A vivid example of how the pace of change has slowed.
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Tim Sneath Oct 11
Replying to @timsneath
By comparison, the gap between a 2010 MacBook and a 2020 MacBook is shockingly narrow. Looking at this spec sheet from 2020 eyes, I'm imagining that this computer would run today's software reasonably well if macOS supported it:
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