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The Crick
The Francis Crick Institute is a biomedical discovery institute dedicated to understanding the fundamental biology underlying human health and disease.
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The Crick retweeted
UCL Public Engagement Mar 22
Interested in working with community, voluntary organisations or researchers in Somers Town? Join us for our next event on 24 April! Delivered in partnership with
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Theresa May Apr 19
It was fascinating to visit the Francis Crick Institute with Prime Minister of India yesterday. We met scientists working at and heard about the exciting work being undertaken there.
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Narendra Modi Apr 18
Glimpses from my visit to the Francis Crick Institute.
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Narendra Modi Apr 18
Visiting the Francis Crick Institute was a good learning experience. I congratulate the Institute for their pioneering work and notable efforts towards a healthier tomorrow.
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The Crick Apr 18
This afternoon, Prime Ministers and met some of the 33 Indian scientists working at the Crick, as well as getting a flavour of the research taking place here.
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The Crick Apr 18
Be bold, we say to our staff. Be dynamic. We mean in their science. Some go right ahead and take selfies with world leaders when they visit!
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CrickPepChemistry Apr 18
Peptide chemists, Hema and Dhira meet Narendra Modi and Theresa May today.
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Aakriti Jain Apr 18
Had the honor of taking a selfie with indian & british PMs & on their visit to meet Indian scientists
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The Crick Apr 18
We were delighted to be able to welcome and to the Crick today, to launch a new UK-India Tech Alliance.
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James Briscoe Apr 18
New from the O'Garra lab : c-Maf gene networks in CD4+ T cells Our (minor) contribution by means I get to pretend I'm an immunologist again. Story behind the paper:
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The Crick Apr 18
Please note that our exhibition and cafe are both closed today. We apologise for any inconvenience caused. We'll be back to normal opening hours from tomorrow.
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The Crick Apr 17
Please note our exhibition and cafe will both be closed tomorrow. We apologise for any inconvenience caused. We'll be back to normal opening hours from Thursday.
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The Crick Apr 17
Scientific advances often come about from spontaneous discussions, for example, at the institute bar! Find out how a chance conversation over a drink helped some our scientists unravel the immune system's secrets. 👩🏻‍🔬🍻👨🏾‍🔬
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The Crick retweeted
The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust Apr 15
Dr Samra Turajlic, Consultant Oncologist at The Royal Marsden and from , was lead author in this major cancer study. Mike, who also features in the video, took part in the trial and is one of our patients
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Charles Swanton Apr 12
Why some cancers are 'born to be bad' - BBC : congratulations Samra and TRACERx team and thank you
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The Crick Apr 13
Mike donated his kidney tumour for research. We invited him to the Crick to meet scientists who know more about cancer thanks to Mike and other patients & Find out more in our feature:
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The Crick Apr 13
Join us at for a Crick Chat on May 2, a free discussion between Crick scientist Iris Salecker and artist Helen Pynor. Booking is required.
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The Crick Apr 12
A funded study reveals there are 3 distinct types of kidney cancer: some that are 'born to be bad', others that never become aggressive, and some in between. Knowing which type of cancer a patient has could one day lead to personalised treatment.
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The Crick Apr 12
The team analysed over 1,000 tumour samples from 100 kidney cancer patients in order to reconstruct the sequence of genetic events that led to the in each patient, discovering that some cancers are 'born to be bad'.
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The Crick Apr 12
. scientists have discovered that kidney cancer follows distinct evolutionary paths, enabling them to detect whether a tumour will be aggressive and revealing that the first seeds of kidney are sown as early as childhood.
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