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teseitommaso
There is a curious tendency in current scholarship to acknowledge the relationship between the Qurʾān and Late Antiquity while simultaneously rejecting any direct connection between concepts, ideas, beliefs, and stories in the Qurʾān and those found in late antique texts.
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teseitommaso 11 Feb 19
Replying to @teseitommaso
Common elements between the Qurʾān and the writings of the late antique world are mostly explained through recourse to the notion of “shared culture” without trying to explain the dynamics of this cultural sharing.
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teseitommaso 11 Feb 19
Replying to @teseitommaso
The Qurʾān is read in conversation with the complex of ideas expressed in other late antique documents, without, however, attempting to delineate the historical circumstances that may lie behind the circulation and transmission of those very same ideas.
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teseitommaso 11 Feb 19
Replying to @teseitommaso
This widespread historical agnosticism would appear to be largely a result of scholarly caution, which is motivated by the notoriously precarious reliability of the extant historical sources.
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teseitommaso 11 Feb 19
Replying to @teseitommaso
While understandable, this scholarly prudence often results in the renunciation to investigate the dynamics behind the genesis of the Qurʾānic corpus.
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teseitommaso 11 Feb 19
Replying to @teseitommaso
A more pernicious tendency—equally present in current scholarship—is the paternalistic (surely post-colonialist, but perhaps also neocolonialist) attitude of Western scholars towards Islam.
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teseitommaso 11 Feb 19
Replying to @teseitommaso
This tendency, which I call “Qurʾānic exceptionalism,” leads scholars to dismiss, in the case of the Qurʾān, what would seem to be plausible to scholars in any other field of study.
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teseitommaso 11 Feb 19
Replying to @teseitommaso
In most cases “Qurʾānic exceptionalism” is dictated by the commendable intent to oppose current and deplorable Islamophobia spread by Western politicians and media—often combined with the perpetual battle against the phantom of classical Orientalism.
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teseitommaso 11 Feb 19
Replying to @teseitommaso
However noble its aims may be, “Qurʾānic exceptionalism” inhibits any critical analysis of the Qurʾān’s relationship with its historical context.
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teseitommaso 11 Feb 19
Replying to @teseitommaso
Indeed, while formally acknowledged as a late antique text, the Qurʾān is treated as an exception to the type of critical historical investigation commonly applied to the study of other late antique documents.
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Constanze Fertig 12 Feb 19
Replying to @teseitommaso
You should definitely have a look at the Corpus Coranicum Project, as well as the publications by Angelika Neuwirth „The Qur‘an and Lade Antiquity“. Afaik she‘s challenging exatzly this „Quranic exceptionalism“ you‘ve described.
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teseitommaso 12 Feb 19
Replying to @diejungedame
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