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Daniel A. Beck 24 Dec 18
Just posted a new article arguing that predictive prophecy was much more central to Muhammad’s early mission than is usually believed.
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ⲡϣⲏⲣⲉ ⲙⲡⲣⲱⲙⲉ 24 Dec 18
Replying to @DanielABeck9
Maybe 'Dhul-Qarnayn' was also thought to be an allusion to 'בעל הקרנים' (Daniel 8:20), who gets defeated by the new Alexander, Heraclius. I wonder if Khosrow was portrayed as some kind of new Jamshid?
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teseitommaso
Not exactly: On the background of the epithet DQ there is another kind of anti-Sasanian propaganda. In the Syriac Alexander Legend (which was composed at the time of Justinian, not Heraclius) there is an unparalleled association of Alexander with the Danielic goat
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teseitommaso 25 Dec 18
The goal of the Syriac author is to project on Alexander (and thus on Byzantium) the legacy of Cyrus the Great and to contemporary deprive the Sasanian of their alleged Achaemenid legacy
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ⲡϣⲏⲣⲉ ⲙⲡⲣⲱⲙⲉ 25 Dec 18
Thank you for responding. Speaking of the Syriac legend, I think its relationship to the Quranic story is by far more complicated: while the legend talks about an entire deadly ocean, the Quran mentions simply a spring. Paraphrasing a ocean as a spring is quite strange to me.
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ⲡϣⲏⲣⲉ ⲙⲡⲣⲱⲙⲉ 25 Dec 18
The classical sources, however, mention a 'sun of a spring' in the Amon Oasis, coincidentally the westernmost place Alexander visited, that gets hot after the sun set. It somehow fits better into the quranic decription.
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