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Tas van Ommen
Antarctic climate scientist specialising in ice core paleoclimate and glaciology. Opinions my own.
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Tas van Ommen retweeted
antarctica.gov.au 7h
This summer a team of undertook seismic studies on the largest glacier in East revealing for the first time a network of lakes beneath the ice. The researchers were studying the Totten Glacier, near Casey station.
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Tas van Ommen Mar 22
Drop me an email - thanks!
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Tas van Ommen Mar 22
Did I say “What’s under the ice...”? Hopefully context made it clear anyway 😉
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Tas van Ommen retweeted
Steven Chown Mar 22
What a pleasure to be talking about Antarctica at with ⁦⁩ ⁦⁩ ⁦⁩ and ⁦⁩ Thanks ⁦⁩ for a memorable & worthwhile evening
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Tas van Ommen Mar 19
Replying to @peter_neff @ericsteig
That’s brilliant! Can I use it with credits?
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Tas van Ommen Mar 19
Replying to @kevpluck @42_cliff
I’d like to see E Antarctica and W Antarctica separated. Cool.
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Tas van Ommen retweeted
antarctica.gov.au Mar 17
. will be at talking to students about what it takes to do one of the coolest jobs on earth on 22 March. Bookings essential: 📷 P Kimball
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Tas van Ommen Mar 13
Replying to @IndyCouncilGrp
Unintended swipe subtract 1 from TM’s deal :o
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Tas van Ommen Mar 13
Replying to @jo_m_chandler
Memorable and fun despite the challenges. Never tire of being a speck in the great white expanse.
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Tas van Ommen Mar 12
It’s for your own good! You won’t feel a thing.
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Tas van Ommen Mar 12
Replying to @tasvo
The Oldest Ice project involves collaboration and cooperation from many nations to support the logistical and scientific demands. Momentum is building and current plans should see ice cores and answers over the next 5 years. (End)
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Tas van Ommen Mar 12
Replying to @tasvo
The old ice is near the base of the ice sheet around 3 km deep. Sustaining the drilling field camp, maintaining the equipment and returning the tonnes of ice core, secure and cold, to laboratories across the world is a huge undertaking. /8
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Tas van Ommen Mar 12
Replying to @tasvo
This involves putting a camp of about a dozen scientists, engineers and support crew in remote, cold, high central Antarctica for 3-5 summer field seasons. Once there the drillers lower a drill on a cable into the ice hundreds of times, retrieving a few metres core each run /7
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Tas van Ommen Mar 12
Replying to @tasvo
To be certain we need to drill two or more cores to the base of the Antarctic ice to get a reproduced record of climate change over a million years or (hopefully) more. /6
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Tas van Ommen Mar 12
Replying to @tasvo
We are reasonably certain that ice near the bottom of the Antarctic icecap dates to over a million years ago. If we can recover such ice we get significant new evidence to address this. /5
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Tas van Ommen Mar 12
Replying to @tasvo
It’s possible that the answer to ice age pacing involves the role of CO2. Ice cores, with their trapped bubbles, can give a direct record of CO2 change through this period. And this is at the heart of the scientific challenge./4
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Tas van Ommen Mar 12
Replying to @tasvo
Importantly what does this mean for understanding where the climate heads in the longer term, particularly given the current CO2 “kick” that humanity is giving to the climate system?/3
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Tas van Ommen Mar 12
Replying to @tasvo
Why is it that, around a million years ago, the pacing of global ice age cycles shifted from 41 thousand years to a slower 100 thousand year “heartbeat”? What is it we don’t currently understand right now?/2
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Tas van Ommen Mar 12
So what is Oldest Ice: why are we interested, and what’s involved? Well, if we can get an ice core over a million years old, we get major clues to solve a significant climate puzzle (thread )/1 ?
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Tas van Ommen Mar 12
Enjoyable several days in Bern with colleagues - diving deep into plans for drilling Oldest Ice from Antarctica in coming years.
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