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Scott Winship
Director of Social Capital Project, Joint Economic Committee, Office of Vice Chairman . Tweets are my own, obvi.
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Scott Winship retweeted
Jim Rose Aug 19
Moving on up is a smart phone, dishwasher & dryer via
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Scott Winship retweeted
Economic Innovation Aug 17
“I think the real story here is one of race and place,” took questions at from EIG’s alongside and Dr. Caroline Radcliffe to examine the current state of economic mobility and the American Dream
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Jonathan Haidt Aug 16
How a writer got every fact wrong about . And much wrong about data on current campus trends. I like Vox, and was surprised to find such careless writing. Rebuttal by
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John Bailey Aug 16
Great piece by The Roots of Economic Opportunity Are Local – In Our Homes, Work, and Communities.
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April Ponnuru Aug 16
Happy birthday, ! 🎂 Aside from being a great husband, father, and friend, you're one of the few who manage to keep it together on Twitter, so cheers to you!
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Ryan Decker Aug 16
Interesting thing about the Warren idea is that it mainly applies to large firms. The Vox write-up did not mention the voluminous literature on size-dependent distortions. Also did not mention the literature on the large firm wage premium.
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Scott Winship Aug 16
Wrong. I’ve argued all along that the CW exaggerates our economic challenges. I voted for Obama once. I voted for Clinton. I got here by following the evidence
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Scott Winship Aug 16
Well, the decline in the US probably isn’t about labor demand, so not sure how that bears on x-nat comparisons
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Scott Winship Aug 16
This is why I defend American capitalism
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Scott Winship Aug 16
It certainly betrays some laziness
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Scott Winship Aug 15
See, I look at those better off numbers and see that we're back to 2007 and approaching late '90s. People were pretty happy with things then, if I recall!
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Scott Winship Aug 15
I've got other probs here too. I don't think the evidence supports the idea that Americans are up in arms about inequality. In fact, I think Americans are much more optimistic and secure than the CW says.
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Scott Winship Aug 15
Yes, but again, I was reacting to the "saving capitalism" hyperbole, and those specific problems you document are not necessarily solved by the same policies that would address a huge general rise in inequality
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Scott Winship Aug 15
And that's fine if people want to storm the castle because inequality is the same as in 1980. But then that's what we would need to say as researchers & policymakers, not that it's risen through the roof.
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Scott Winship Aug 15
Yes, to be clear, 90/50 or 80/50 inequality is up (but even there less than people seem to believe, post-T&T). I just think the social construction of what's a problem is fascinating.
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Scott Winship Aug 15
Thx. Not complacent though--just trying to right-size and redirect concern from policies based on bad takes addressing non-issues to more important issues like black intergenerational immobility. I'd LOVE not to spend my days on defense, but someone has to
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Scott Winship Aug 15
Official numbers are wrong, for well-understood reasons. Google Winship poverty after welfare reform
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Scott Winship Aug 15
And IF that's true, are policymakers duty bound to address voter concerns based on evidence that is wrong?
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Scott Winship Aug 15
And if there is no reliable basis for claims about the magnitude of the rise in inequality, then how legitimate can the claims of the median voter be? What's more likely is that people believe what they read, watch on TV, and absorb in everyday conversations & social media.
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Scott Winship Aug 15
This raises the issue of how people "know" what they know about inequality, and of whether the objective facts even matter. If it's plausible that income concentration hasn't grown, & if plausible that it has grown a lot, what basis is there for the median voter evaluating?
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