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Cristina Milos
Making myself progressively unnecessary. Therefore, a teacher.
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Cristina Milos retweeted
Carl Hendrick Feb 18
This is a masterful state of the union address from on education research - Well worth 20 minutes of your time.
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Cristina Milos retweeted
paul moss Feb 18
CREATIVITY IS IMPORTANT, but how do we get there?
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Cristina Milos Feb 18
We fail again and again...as intellectuals. And the public discourse is not getting any better either.
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Cristina Milos Feb 18
Exceptionally good read via : 7 Differences between Complex and Complicated Problems
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Cristina Milos Feb 17
Replying to @SangitaNair
Thank you - I really tried to make it simple, clear, and useful for teachers while enabling them to see the connections between different parts.
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Cristina Milos retweeted
Jon Andrews Feb 14
Stephen Brookfield absolutely nails it here. Knowing that in your school and within its structures you are valued, even if a voice of criticality and alternative perspective, is vital to a healthy work culture.
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Cristina Milos Feb 16
I am often struck by the genius of the human mind and hands... Here in Rome /Vatican that never ceases to amaze me.
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Cristina Milos Feb 16
Replying to @surreallyno
Vagueness does not help anyone, least the students. That you will tweak the planning according to the dynamic context of your classroom is an entirely different topic. 2/2
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Cristina Milos Feb 16
My two cents. 1/2 1. *Articulate* what students should know, be able to do and understand at the end of a series of lessons. 2. Be *strategic and intentional* in your planning.
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Cristina Milos Feb 16
Replying to @Cukalu
You are welcome, I'm glad you find it useful.
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Cristina Milos Feb 16
To be honest, it is disheartening to just *know* that there are ed. myths still pervasive in teacher professional development... In my view, this is pure malpractice from the side of the PD developers and schools that accept such claims (e.g. learning "styles").
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Cristina Milos Feb 16
You are welcome - glad it is helpful!
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Cristina Milos Feb 16
Oh, absolutely...
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Cristina Milos Feb 16
Replying to @TannujainJain
Your view of the planner misses a big point - which, understandably, cannot be grasped in a single picture. At nearly every level students are agents of learning (e.g. Interview - they decide what school or community leaders they wish to interview and create the questions).
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Cristina Milos retweeted
#SuperbSchools🌍 Feb 16
What educational myth (or as put it 'pervasive misunderstanding') do you dislike the most? Why? (Comment below) Please RT for a larger sample 😁
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Cristina Milos Feb 16
Oh, don't get me started on ed. myths - they never seem to die... And I wrote that years ago.
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Cristina Milos Feb 16
Replying to @davidgostelow1
You are welcome, David.
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Cristina Milos Feb 16
Replying to @SeanPYPParis
Hi Sean, I think knowledge and skills are the most important in what regards our ability as teachers to observe and assess. We will have rubrics, journals, and self-assessment checkpoints for other aspects (e.g. Learner Profile), but that is difficult to evaluate objectively.
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Cristina Milos retweeted
Sam Gibbs Feb 14
‘The challenge in education now isn’t coming up with great ideas - but with implementing them well’. Tom Rees delivers the keynote at Transforming Teaching Senior Leaders Conference.
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Cristina Milos Feb 15
Replying to @surreallyno
This is based on Gareth Jacobson's idea of levels of understanding - students reflect where they are and can move up throughout the inquiry. We create them for each line of inquiry. 2/2
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