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Sunny Singh
Thread: before living in Barcelona, I did not understand how strongly Catalans felt about Spanish government policies and attitudes
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Sunny Singh Oct 1
Replying to @sunnysingh_n6
And make no mistake, the resentment is deep seated and strong. And yes historical. And it is not only Franco but goes further back
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Sunny Singh Oct 1
Replying to @sunnysingh_n6
But of course the Civil War and the decades of brutal repression by Franco crystalised much of the anger.
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Sunny Singh Oct 1
Replying to @sunnysingh_n6
Catalan institutions and culture, even language was banned under Franco. And yes, the banning was done with imperial ambitions
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Sunny Singh Oct 1
Replying to @sunnysingh_n6
Spanish state implemented the sole use of Spanish and Catalans were told to 'speak the language of the Empire.'
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Sunny Singh Oct 1
Replying to @sunnysingh_n6
Btw similar albeit (with region specific tweaks) policies were put in place in the Basque country. So yes, the repression was real!
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Sunny Singh Oct 1
Replying to @redlightvoices
It was the crumbling empire turning the policies it had developed and deployed overseas to places closer home (see 's TL)
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Sunny Singh Oct 1
Replying to @redlightvoices
And after Franco died, the Spanish state never really confronted the issues. Never brought the perpetrators of brutality to account
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Sunny Singh Oct 1
Replying to @redlightvoices
A kind of comfortable silence was pulled over the past. But no structural changes were made to institutions and agencies, esp police
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Sunny Singh Oct 1
Replying to @sunnysingh_n6
That is why Spain's military regularly pipes up to threaten various provinces demanding separation, independence+change. They never reformed
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Sunny Singh Oct 1
Replying to @sunnysingh_n6
Also why if you live in Barcelona, you quickly learn to differentiate between Mossos and the police. The former are often quite friendly
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Sunny Singh Oct 1
Replying to @sunnysingh_n6
The latter however are just terrifying. I learned one night how much the locals had the fear enbedded in the while walking down Montjuic
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Sunny Singh Oct 1
Replying to @sunnysingh_n6
All we did was walk past a van full of police. I found it weird that cops were lurking in the dark. My friend however was shaking in fear
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Sunny Singh Oct 1
Replying to @sunnysingh_n6
And you see the elderly? The yayos? They have first hand experience and memory of Franco's regime
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Florian R Fischer Oct 1
Replying to @sunnysingh_n6
Do you think a non-con Madrid government might have responded less idiotically heavy-handed? i.e. is there fascist residue in this response?
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Sunny Singh Oct 1
Replying to @sunnysingh_n6
And btw it is even more complicated because Franco came to power after a Civil War. Not everyone in Catalunya was a republican.
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Flavia Dzodan Oct 1
Replying to @sunnysingh_n6
folks should really read this research w/ details of Catalonian deaths at the hands of Franco during civil war
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Sunny Singh Oct 1
Replying to @sunnysingh_n6
And with all Civil Wars, the wounds and scare are internal. Families split against eachother then. And the pain has not gone away
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Sunny Singh Oct 1
Replying to @sunnysingh_n6
Instead the refusal to confront the events, legacies and brutality has meant the wounds still fester just below the surface
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Sunny Singh Oct 1
Replying to @sunnysingh_n6
I wrote a short story (Faded Serge and Yellowed Lace) about Barcelona and the repressed fury that lingers below the surface there
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