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Steve Troughton-Smith 8 May 17
After all the talk of Tizen that went nowhere, Google appears to be the one designing an OS to replace Android
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Steve Troughton-Smith 8 May 17
Replying to @stroughtonsmith
We’re far enough into the age of mobile that the big players are designing the OSes that’ll follow it—surprised if Apple isn’t doing same
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Steve Troughton-Smith
It’s not so crazy to think that Apple would want to replace both iOS and macOS with something new and more unified. Post-XNU, post-BSD
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Martin Pilkington 8 May 17
Replying to @stroughtonsmith
Possibly, but Apple doesn't quite have the same strategic problems as Google with Android, they had control from the start
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Edward ⛄️ Marczak (beta) 8 May 17
Replying to @stroughtonsmith
We're completely past due.
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Martin Pilkington 8 May 17
Replying to @stroughtonsmith
And the question is what benefits would Apple gain from a completely new OS vs incrementally replacing parts of an old one?
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Steve Troughton-Smith 8 May 17
Replying to @pilky
Apple have two OSes that they're trying to bring forward, together. Both are full of legacy baggage of their own. Both need > web services
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adastra 8 May 17
Replying to @stroughtonsmith
What would the main selling point be? What shortcoming of iOS / macOS legacy should it fix (other than unification)?
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Alberto Sendra 8 May 17
Replying to @stroughtonsmith
I think they are enough resource constrained as it is!
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Martin Pilkington 8 May 17
Replying to @stroughtonsmith
Oh sure, but they're not in that bad a state that we'd need a full Classic -> OS X style transition
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Ryan Wilson 8 May 17
Replying to @stroughtonsmith
Written in Swift perhaps? They keep mentioning it's meant to scale "from 'hello, world' to an entire operating system"
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Glen Gray 8 May 17
Replying to @stroughtonsmith
Let's get swift nailed down first
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adastra 8 May 17
Yep. macOS (X) is now 16 years counting from release (ignoring NeXTStep and Rhapsody years). The original MacOS got replaced at 15.
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Kane 8 May 17
Replying to @stroughtonsmith
Great opportunity to ditch Obj-C too
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Bob 8 May 17
Replying to @stroughtonsmith
what's the benefit associated with it? I don't see them selling more Macs because of it.
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Ville Turpeinen 8 May 17
Replying to @stroughtonsmith
Definitely! Think about how fast we moved to APFS, nine moths from introduction to GA, and Apple did it without blinking an eye.
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Edward ⛄️ Marczak (beta) 8 May 17
Sure, but the world is also ready for an OS that is new, not based on Unix.
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adastra 8 May 17
Like new buildings, not based on steel & concrete? At some point, if it works, it's good enough. What end user benefit from new kernel?
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Edward ⛄️ Marczak (beta) 8 May 17
"Good enough" isn't the right bar. The Unix kernel and subsystems have lots of flaws. MS was on to something with Singularity.
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adastra 8 May 17
What's end user benefit though - better parallellism = no more beachballs on Safari, Photos? Thought Swift could help there wo new kernel.
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