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Steve Eagar
The State of Texas today had to remove 3,484 cases from its Covid-19 positive case count, because the San Antonio Health Department was reporting “probable” cases for people never actually tested, as “confirmed” positive cases.- TDHS What other departments make this same mistake?
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Steve Eagar Jul 16
Replying to @TexasDSHS
Here is more information from the state on the nearly 35-hundred San Antonio “probable” cases removed from Texas’ “positive” case count from the state. Although the CDC is mentioned, a positive Antigen test is also considered a “probable” case in guidelines adopted by
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Steve Eagar Jul 16
Replying to @TexasDSHS
Here are the guidelines for “positive” versus “probable” case designation.
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Damian Caraballo MD Jul 16
Replying to @steveeagar
I suppose the deaths & ice truck morgues are a deep state conspiracy as well
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Steve Eagar Jul 16
Replying to @813JAFERD
Ah, the not unique and always uninteresting “Doctor God” complex. If facts harm you somehow, then you are weak.
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City of San Antonio🧼+👐=💯 Jul 16
Replying to @steveeagar
Probable cases do not mean ‘maybe’ cases of COVID-19. Antigen tests are FDA approved & positive tests are highly accurate. SA is one of only three TX cities collecting and reporting this data per CDC guidelines, but the State wants apples-to-apples comparisons between TX cities.
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Steve Eagar Jul 16
Replying to @COSAGOV @TexasDSHS
Question: These updated instructions on reporting “positive” and “probable” cases were updated on May 11th. Did you receive this instruction? When was the date of last reporting Antigen positive cases positive rather than probable? Thanks. 2/2
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Texas DSHS Jul 16
Replying to @steveeagar
Hi Steve, these probable cases did test positive for COVID-19 by an antigen test. Antigen tests detect current COVID-19 infections but are considered probable cases under the national case definition used by the CDC.
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Steve Eagar Jul 16
Replying to @TexasDSHS @CDCgov
Again, I appreciate your reply. Thank you. Question: - does your tweet, seemingly verifying the accuracy of antigen tests, mean you don’t agree with your own or the ‘s classifications or definitions used for positive and probable cases?
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Brittney Martin Jul 16
Replying to @steveeagar
You've gotten 11,000 retweets on this and it's been shared all over Facebook, but it's inaccurate. Metro Health did not make a mistake. Those 3,484 cases were diagnosed using FDA approved antigen tests. The real question is why the state isn't counting these positive test results
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Cheetah Audio Jul 16
Where did he get that they were “never tested”?
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