Twitter | Search | |
Sir Stanley Wells
Too many current productions use - exploit - Shakespeare’s plays parasitically for eg political social or cultural purposes rather than interpreting them. Thus directors become surrogate playwrights.
Reply Retweet Like More
Sir Stanley Wells Dec 23
Replying to @mcelhearn
Epidemics happen.
Reply Retweet Like
Martin Owen Dec 23
Replying to @stanley_wells
A production without political purpose is political.
Reply Retweet Like
Sir Stanley Wells Dec 23
Replying to @Martin_Owen
But whose?
Reply Retweet Like
Matt Carter, PhD Dec 23
Replying to @stanley_wells
Respectfully, I'd say that's what good performances do. A performance without a political investment isn't speaking to the moment, and therefore, speaks "at" the audience instead of conversing *with* them. No text has ever been performed without that filter. Not even Bill's.
Reply Retweet Like
Ian Gould Dec 23
Replying to @stanley_wells
It’s a difficult line to draw - what might strike one person as an interpretation grounded in authorial intent may strike another as a wild overreach. And Mr S isn’t here for us to ask him.
Reply Retweet Like
Montgomery Sutton Dec 23
To me the line is fairly simple: if a production answers more questions than it asks, then we're receiving a director's personal essay rather than being invited to explore a story that can inspire us to challenge our own opinions and our presumptions about the opinions of others.
Reply Retweet Like
Mary Pittman Jones Dec 23
Replying to @stanley_wells
I often wonder what people who are experiencing a Shakespeare play for the first time make of some of the recent productions that I have seen.
Reply Retweet Like
Régis A B Closel Dec 23
Replying to @stanley_wells
I hope to see great productions in the future or at least honestly labeled as "based or inspired on" Sx
Reply Retweet Like
Pacific Repertory Dec 23
Replying to @stanley_wells
But isn’t that the purpose of good theatre - to hold a mirror up to nature, as it were?
Reply Retweet Like