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Snook 13 Dec 18
I used SMACSS in a long living large web application with multiple web developers working simultaneously with changing requirements without CSS-in-JS. You know how? By treating CSS the same way JS is treated.
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Snook 13 Dec 18
Replying to @snookca
I don't understand how JS devs can be so good at remembering to use the proper capitalization and making sure they spell variable and property names correctly but throw a .css extension on the file and all hell breaks loose. I don't get it.
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Snook
In what way is JS any more maintainable than CSS? How does writing CSS in JS make it any more maintainable?
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Snook 13 Dec 18
Replying to @jessejanderson
I can do that with CSS or Sass.
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Sunil Pai 13 Dec 18
Replying to @snookca
Hi, I wrote a reply to this tweet I’m a gist. It got a bit long, but I hope it answers your question, even if partially so 🍻
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Snook 13 Dec 18
Replying to @threepointone
and I managed to finish writing my retort! Thanks!
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Micah Godbolt 13 Dec 18
Replying to @snookca
For us it's the ability to evaluate styles at runtime. This means that we can move all theming into the top of the application, and everything picks it up via context. This opens up a TON of cross application/cross theme scenarios that static css just won't support.
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Snook 13 Dec 18
Replying to @micahgodbolt
I'd be curious to see this implemented.
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Zach Leatherman 13 Dec 18
Replying to @snookca
My guess is that CSS-in-JS, as a term, is far too broad and has too much baggage at this point to represent a thing you can argue for or against. Runtime baggage is the big no-no for me, but I’ve been told some of (not all) the CSS-in-JS libraries don’t have that baggage.
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Zach Leatherman 13 Dec 18
Replying to @snookca
oh no I’ve said baggage three times in one tweet
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Noah Stokes 13 Dec 18
Replying to @snookca
I think it’s because CSS is so loose in terms of what you name your ID’s and classes?
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Snook 13 Dec 18
Replying to @motherfuton
I can name my javascript variables and objects whatever I want. I can modify and override prototypes.
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