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Sho Kuwamoto
Director of Product at , focusing on design systems. Expert home lunch maker (was school lunch maker). My dog is basically my boss.
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Sho Kuwamoto 5h
Replying to @arb
Oh Amy
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Sho Kuwamoto 18h
Replying to @elainecchao
Plot twist: these are both the same math problem
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Sho Kuwamoto 22h
Replying to @elainecchao
It’s funny how certain numbers are intuitive and some aren’t. Example: which is harder? 25% of 4 4% of 25
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Sho Kuwamoto 22h
Replying to @elainecchao
It’s funny how certain numbers are intuitive and some aren’t. Example: which is harder? 25% of 4 4% of 25
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Sho Kuwamoto Nov 29
Not sure whether to be happy or sad but...
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Sho Kuwamoto Nov 28
Still waiting on your flex,
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Sho Kuwamoto Nov 28
Replying to @danfuzz
Same as mine!
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Sho Kuwamoto Nov 28
Replying to @CLK55 @dan_schmidt
“Was”
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Sho Kuwamoto retweeted
Sho Kuwamoto Nov 28
Replying to @nkh1l @dan_schmidt
Tbh the way I would do 17 x 24 is this: 24 * 10 is 240 24 * 7 is... oh shit 2 * 7 is 14 4 * 7 is 28 ... uh... where was I?
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Sho Kuwamoto Nov 28
Replying to @nkh1l @dan_schmidt
Tbh the way I would do 17 x 24 is this: 24 * 10 is 240 24 * 7 is... oh shit 2 * 7 is 14 4 * 7 is 28 ... uh... where was I?
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Sho Kuwamoto Nov 28
Replying to @nkh1l
Another weird example: If someone asked me to multiply 36 by 5, I would think this: 36 x 5 = 360 / 2 = 180
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Sho Kuwamoto Nov 28
Replying to @nkh1l
I’m not saying it’s a good general method for all numbers. Numbers like 16 and 24 sound very binary to me, so they’re special.
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Sho Kuwamoto Nov 28
Replying to @dan_schmidt
was the closest to the above, I think
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Sho Kuwamoto Nov 28
Replying to @skuwamoto
This is not meant to be a nerd flex (ok maybe a tiny one) but this is honestly how it goes in my head and I thought a lot of computer ppl might do it the same way 16 x 24 = 1.5 x (16 x 16) = 1.5 x 256 = 384
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Sho Kuwamoto Nov 28
Surprised by the variety of answers to this. How would you solve this problem in your head?
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Sho Kuwamoto Nov 27
Replying to @kelseymwhelan
Oh no!!!!
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Sho Kuwamoto Nov 23
Can’t tell in yitong’s case because it’s not scrolled to the bottom but in this case, the UI is telling you that the “check” component is malformed.
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Sho Kuwamoto Nov 23
Replying to @sanketc91 @figmadesign
Thank you! 🙏
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Sho Kuwamoto Nov 23
[Scene: watching snoopy and Woodstock eat turkey on tv] Me: aw, how cute! Sean: isn’t woodstock... a bird?
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Sho Kuwamoto Nov 22
Replying to @shykovart @figmadesign
If I understand you correctly you can do this today. Just set up two properties: one called “label” with on/off values and one called “helper” with on/off values.
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