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Simon Carn Jun 21
Impressive, SO2-rich plume from of (Kuril Islands) spreading across the North Pacific on June 22. data indicate ~0.3 Tg SO2 but eruption is ongoing. SO2 columns up to ~1000 DU in the plume.
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Simon Carn Jun 21
Images of the ash plume from Terra and Aqua MODIS on June 22.
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Simon Carn Jun 22
Update on the SO2 emissions. AIRS nighttime overpass (15:05 UTC, June 22) detecting ~0.4 Tg total SO2 mass in the cloud. Leading edge of plume is over the Aleutian Islands.
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Simon Carn
Latest SO2 data (June 23) shows much higher SO2 mass of ~1.35 Tg in the volcanic cloud. Log scale used here to show large range in SO2 column. Northern arm of plume is being entrained into a cyclone over the Aleutian Is.
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Dawn Morning Jun 23
Is this an something to be concerned about? Seems like it to me but not sure..
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AIRES Jun 23
If you are flying through the region, perhaps check with airlines for delays but there is a good system of aviation warnings in place. Current estimates of SO2 emissions, while large are not climate significant.... so far.
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Simon Carn Jun 24
SO2 spreading in multiple directions from the volcanic cloud on June 24. The bulk of the plume is now drifting over the Bering Sea. Data from .
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AIRES Jun 24
That is just a great visualisation of atmospheric fluid dynamics!
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David Lorier-May Jun 24
Do you reckon it was a plinian sized eruption?
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cartocalypse Jun 24
Your color scale is misleading
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Jan Vandamme Jun 24
Would this be labelled as a VEI 5?
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Global Volcanism Program Jun 24
There's not much beyond plume altitude to base a VEI assignment on, but if the preliminary numbers are correct, this is a VEI 4 eruption. That could change if there are later explosive events that rise higher and are sustained longer.
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Global Volcanism Program Jun 24
There's not much beyond plume altitude to base a VEI assignment on, but if the preliminary numbers are correct, this is a VEI 4 eruption. That could change if there are later explosive events that rise higher and are sustained longer. Some people call VEI 4 eruptions as Plinian.
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Jan Vandamme Jun 24
Thank you, it's interesting.
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Dawn Morning Jun 24
Thank you
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Simon Carn Jun 24
SO2 in the dispersing eruption cloud continues to reveal the complex fluid dynamics in Earth's atmosphere. Data from on June 25.
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Kristian Jun 25
is the eruption still in progress? Is the VEI classification more or less known already? Thank you!
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Global Volcanism Program Jun 25
There's not much beyond plume altitude to base a VEI assignment on so far, but if the preliminary numbers are correct, this is a VEI 4 eruption. That could change if there are additional large explosive events that rise higher and are sustained longer.
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Jan Vandamme Jun 25
Intersting to compare with Sarychev, 10 years ago. Seems like Raikoke is slightly smaller.
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Jan Vandamme Jun 25
Has it fallen so much? 1.42 Tg to 0.966 Tg? or did half a Tg just move out of frame?
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