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Mike Sheldon
Don't talk to me about reasonable, I don't DO reasonable!
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day 17h
Posey-Yard A garden; a court near a dwelling.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Sep 19
Painter A corruption of panther. The popular name of the cougar or panther.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Sep 18
Nation A corruption of damnation. Immense, enormous; very, extremely. Used in both ways in Old and in New England. "There were a nation set a' folks at kirk." — Carr's Craven Gloss.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Sep 17
Mortal Used in vulgar parlance adverbially for mortally, i.e. excessively. "It was a mortal hot day, and people actually sweated to that degree it laid the dust." — Sam Slick, 3d Ser., p. 102.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Sep 16
Lumber-Wagon A wagon with a plain box upon it, used by farmers for carrying their produce to market. It is sometimes so arranged that a spring seat may be put in it, when it is very comfortable for riding in.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Sep 15
Kool Slaa. (Cut cabbage.) A contraction for the Dutch Kool-salade, i.e. Cabbage salad. Many persons who affect accuracy, but do not know the origin of the term, pronounce the first syllable as if it were the English word cold. Some even write it so.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Sep 14
Jugful "Not by a jugful" is a phrase commonly used to mean, not by a great deal, by no means. "Downingville is as sweet as a rose. But 'taint so in New York, not by a jugful." Major Downing, May-day in New York.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Sep 13
Headstall A knitted worsted cap, covering all the head but the face, worn by boys in winter.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Sep 12
Grist A large number or quantity. "There's an unaccountable grist of bees, I can tell you; and, if you mean to charge upon such enemies, you must look out for somebody besides Whiskey Centre for your vanguard." — Cooper, The Oak Openings.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Sep 11
Gale Among the ladies, a state of excitement; as, "Mrs. A was in quite a gale on New Year's Day." The ladies, laughing heartily, were fast getting into what, in New England, is sometimes called a gale. — Brooke, Eastford.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Sep 10
Fall 2. The apparatus used in hoisting and lowering goods in ware houses, &c.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Sep 10
Fall-Way The opening or well through which goods are raised and lowered by a fall. It is often merely a succession of openings through the several floors of the building, which are generally unenclosed, and the source of frequent accidents.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Sep 9
To fall Often improperly used for fell in the United States, and in some parts of England; as "to fall a tree," instead of "to fell a tree." — Worcester.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Sep 8
To enjoy To enjoy bad health is a whimsical yet by no means un common expression. "My husband enjoyed miserable health for a number of years afore he died." — Widow Bedott, p. 143.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Sep 7
To dill. (Probably the same as to dull.) To soothe. The word is used in the north of England. "I know what is in this medicine. It'll dill fevers, dry up sores, stop rheumatis, drive out rattlesnake's bite, kill worms, &c." — Margaret, p. 140.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Sep 6
Digging 1. A word first used at the Western lead mines, to denote a place where the ore was dug. Instead of saying this or that mine, the phrase in vogue is these diggings or those diggings. 2. The act of studying hard 3. Dear or costly; as, "A mighty digging price."
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Sep 5
Corn-Trash The outer envelopes of Indian corn, also called husks and shucks. In Jamaica, they are cut in strips and used for stuffing mattresses. "The beds with which they provided their guests were not of feathers, but of wholesome fine picked corn-trash..."
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Sep 4
Calash. (Fr. calèche.) 1. A two-wheeled carriage, resembling a chaise, used in Canada. 2. A covering for the head, usually worn by ladies to protect their head-dresses when going to evening parties, the theatre, &c. It is formed of hoops after the manner of a chaise-top.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Sep 3
Bodewash. (Fr. bois de vache.) Dried cow-dung, used for fuel on the treeless plains of the Far West. Also called Buffalo Chips
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Sep 2
Bettermost The best. The word, which is provincial in England, is used in New England. "The bettermost cow, an expression we do not find in Shakspeare or Milton." Sometimes is heard the expression bettermost best; as, "These girls are dressed in their bettermost best."
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