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Mike Sheldon
Don't talk to me about reasonable, I don't DO reasonable!
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day 19h
Marooning To go marooning is an expression used in the Southern States. It means to go on a picnic. The difference between a marooning party and a picnic is that the former is a party made up to pass several days on the shore or in the country, the latter is a party for a day.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Nov 18
Lose-laid Loose-laid; a weaver's term, and probably English. Weak-willed. — Lowell.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Nov 17
Lawing Going to law. "I got my debt of him by lawing." Western.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Nov 16
Keeping-Room A common sitting-room; not the parlor, but the second-best room. New England. The same expression is used in Norfolk, England, for "the general sitting-room of the family, or common parlor."
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Nov 15
Jug A jail. 1. To be in jug, or in the stone jug, is to be in jail. "So arter this they sentenced me, to make all tight and snug, Afore a reg'lar court o' law, to ten years in the Jug."
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Nov 14
Indignation Meeting A public meeting called by a political or other party, for the purpose of devising means to correct an alleged or real public abuse.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Nov 13
High-studded Airy. Said of one who affects great dignity.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Nov 12
Grocery A grocer's shop. In the plural, the commodities sold by grocers. In the South-west, a grocery is a bar-room, and the term groceries means liquors. The bar-keeper is often told to "fetch on his groceries."
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Nov 11
To grig To vex, irritate. To grig means to pinch, in Somerset, England. That word "superiors" grigged me. Thinks I, "My boy, I 'll just take that expression, roll it up in a ball, and shy it back at you." — S. Slick, Human Nature, p. 83.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Nov 10
Ferry-Flat A flat boat used for crossing, and sometimes for descending, the Mississippi River and its tributaries. Flint says: "The ferry-flat is a scow-boat, and, when used as a boat of descent for families, has a roof or covering."
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Nov 9
Feed Used as a noun, for grass; as, "tall feed," i.e. high grass.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Nov 8
Complected Of a certain complexion, colored in the face. Western. "That lady is mighty pale complected. I'm afeard she's consumpted; she's always complaining of some misery." — Western Sketches.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Nov 7
Cow-Critter A cow. New England and Western.
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Mike Sheldon Nov 6
Replying to @ShatteredGears
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Mike Sheldon Nov 6
Replying to @ShatteredGears
well, hunh, no image...
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Mike Sheldon Nov 6
My favorite kitchen.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Nov 6
Vacher. (French.) The stock or cattle-keeper on the prairies of the South-west. His duty is also to break wild horses, to run cattle, and to brand calves. (Span. vaquero.)
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Nov 5
Particular To express indifference, they say in Pennsylvania, "It's not particular," instead of "No matter;"
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Nov 4
To let sliver To let slip, let fly, i.e. to fire. "Old Yelp smelted the bar; and, as soon as I clapped peeper on him, I let sliver, when the varmint dropped." — Robb, Squatter Life.
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Mike Sheldon retweeted
1877 Word of the Day Nov 3
Middling Well is a common expression for tolerably well. "How are you to-day?" "Wall, I'm pretty middlin', jest so as to be knockin' around." According to Brockett, it is used in the same sense in the north of England.
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