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Sean W. Anthony
Professor, Historian, Orientalist University, Department of Near Eastern Languages & Cultures
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Sean W. Anthony 5h
The literal translation of the Arabic title is indeed "a thousand nights and a night" but as for as I know he called it "Mil y una noches"
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نوادر الآثار والنقوش🇸🇦 21h
مورد ماء قديم و من بادية : قراءة لنقش خلة ابنت عرارة الخياط بنسب متصل إلى جدها الثاني دينار طبيب عبدالملك بن مروان الخليفة الأموي وكنت قبلا أنسبها بهذا النسب إستنادا إلى نقوش عائلتها في هذا الوادي ومنهم والدها عرارة وأبيه محمد وجده أبوقيس وأعمامه
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Sean W. Anthony 7h
Replying to @dbru1 @orientalinst
I don't usually teach the class, so I'm just using my colleagues syllabus with a few minor tweaks. It's probably available on our department website:
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Sean W. Anthony 10h
Husain Haddawy for readability and the earliest version; Malcolm Lyons for accuracy and completeness
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Jonathan Parkes Allen 17h
The following illustrations all come from a 17th c. Ottoman Syrian (probably) rendering of a piece of late medieval epic lit, the story of ʿUmar al-Nuʿmān, to which other tales are attached; sometimes included in the 1001 Nights, or stand-alone as here (Tübingen Ma VI 32). 1/6
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Sean W. Anthony 12h
Replying to @shahanSean
who served at Israelites’ king Solomon. The fisherman tell the genie that Solomon died over 1,800 years ago. Assuming the traditional date assigned to Solomon (10th centy BCE), this actually puts us rather close to the date on this paper fragment.
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Sean W. Anthony 12h
Replying to @shahanSean
On another note about the date, this align with an interesting detail from The Tale of the Fisherman and the Genie. This genie is said to be ʿifrīt, among the genies who served Ṣakhr (called Asmodeus/Ashmedai in Jewish+Christian literature) ...
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Sean W. Anthony 12h
Replying to @shahanSean
How do we actually know the date of artifact though? It turns out that all those extraneous notes scribbled across it surface reveal the date: Ṣafar 266 AH [October 879]. Abbott'ss original study:
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Sean W. Anthony 12h
Replying to @shahanSean
Alas The name of the heroine Shīrāzād/Shahrazād (as imagined by Edmund Dulac in the pic on the right) does not appear, but her sister (or nurse, depending on the version does) by the name Dīnāzād.
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Sean W. Anthony 12h
Replying to @shahanSean
A sample of the actual text appears on the side of the fragment (red box); I've pasted Abbot's transcriptions alongside it.
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Sean W. Anthony 12h
Replying to @shahanSean
That more famous title, "1001 Nights" appears in a booklist from 1127 CE found in the Cairo Geniza discovered by S.D. Goitein at Oxford's Bodleian in MS. Heb. f. 22
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Sean W. Anthony 12h
Replying to @shahanSean
That 2nd, more famous, *1001 Nights* title is not attested until later. (NB: the *Arabian* Nights [Entertainments] is a Anglophone invention of the late-18th century. Truth be told - very little of the Nights is "Arabian".)
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Sean W. Anthony 12h
Replying to @shahanSean
3)of A Thousand Nights, no power| الف ليلة لا حول 4)nor power save by God the| ولا قوة الا بالله ا 5)Lofty, the Mighty|لعلي العظيم Note that the book is called Ḥadīth Alf Laylah (“The Story of a Thousand Nights”) and not Alf Laylah wa-Laylah.
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Sean W. Anthony 12h
Replying to @shahanSean
OI no. 17618 is a *very* early example of work written on paper. This side of the doc has the title [red square] and stray notes and drawings (see the human figure in the green circle). The of the title reads: 1)A book| كتاب 2)Containing the story| فيه حديث ...
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Sean W. Anthony 12h
I’m teaching a course of 1,001 Nights (alf laylah wa-laylah|ألف ليلة وليلة) this semester, so here’s quick thread on the earliest fragment of the work, discovered by Prof. Nabia Abbot and currently held in Chicago. Abbot is famous for her work on early papyri, but..
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Marijn van Putten Jan 24
Apparently some are still under the impression that the Birmingham Fragment (Mingana 1572a + Arabe 328c) is pre-Uthmanic copy of the Quran. This is impossible, despite its strikingly early C14 dating (568-645 CE with 95.4%) it is clearly a descendant of the Uthmanic text type.
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Jasmin Lange Jan 24
Replying to @shahanSean
We have made the online version available in open access. Enjoy!
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Sean W. Anthony Jan 24
Replying to @JasminLange
Wonderful!
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Christian Sahner Jan 24
1/ There are very few women martyrs from the early Islamic period (curious, given there are so many women martyrs from the early church) Today's saints are Nunilo & Alodia, teenage sisters from Aragon killed for apostatizing from Islam in 851
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Touraj Daryaee Jan 23
Ancient Iran Series at UCI Persian Studies Here are the first 10 volumes ده جلد اول مطالعات ایران باستان
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