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Shadi Hamid
Senior Fellow ; Contributing editor ; Author . New book is 'Rethinking Political Islam':
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Shadi Hamid 7h
Replying to @mashagessen
Can a lack of hope be passed down from one generation to another? From 's remarkable and terrifying essay, The Dying Russians
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Shadi Hamid 7h
Replying to @shadihamid
Again, from Eberstadt: "As of 1980, the Russian population may well have been suffering the very highest incidence of mortality from diseases of the circulatory system that had ever been visited on a national population in the entire course of human history"
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Shadi Hamid 7h
Replying to @shadihamid
"Overall life expectancy at age fifteen in the Russian Federation appears in fact to be lower than for some of the countries the UN designates to be least developed... among these, Bangladesh, Cambodia, and Yemen," writes Nicholas Eberstadt, according to 2006 figures
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Shadi Hamid 7h
Replying to @shadihamid
It is (feels) better to build a future that doesn't, and won't, exist
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Shadi Hamid 8h
Replying to @shadihamid
“This is what civil war actually looks like. It’s not when everybody starts running around with guns. It’s when everybody starts dying”
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Shadi Hamid 8h
Replying to @shadihamid
"The deaths kept piling up. People—men and women—were falling, or perhaps jumping, off trains and out of windows; asphyxiating in country houses with faulty wood stoves or in apartments with jammed front-door locks"
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Shadi Hamid 8h
Replying to @omarali50
this is more about low life expectancy (in 2000s was around 65 for Russian men) and high mortality rates among young men
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Shadi Hamid 9h
Can you die from a lack of hope? From ’s The Future Is History
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Shadi Hamid retweeted
Brookings 16h
A survey of nearly 200 political scientists ranks Trump as the most polarizing U.S. president of all time
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Shadi Hamid retweeted
Brookings FP 14h
"The elections in Iraq and Lebanon earlier this month present a fragile but important counterpoint to a region in turmoil. Extremists claim that only violence can bring change; these elections promise another path," writes.
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Shadi Hamid retweeted
Mustafa Akyol 20h
Must-read story on how nationalism curbs religious freedom in , whose capital still doesn’t have a mosque, and its Muslims have to pray “often in basements, converted garages or modest apartments.”
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Shadi Hamid retweeted
Shadi Hamid May 24
In February, I wrote a oped on how centrism—far from the solution to our ills—was actually undermining democracy: I focused on the US but there's some fascinating new data from suggesting a much broader problem:
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Brookings Doha May 26
.: Malaysia offers a reminder that there is no substitute for this most essential of democratic functions: the chance, even if it often resides on a theoretical plane, that political outcomes are not permanent.
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Shadi Hamid May 26
Replying to @jononomo
? no I'm Muslim
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Shadi Hamid May 26
Replying to @ronanfitz22
that hasn't been my experience
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Shadi Hamid May 26
Replying to @propornot
As for majoritarian overreach, even in liberal democracies, large enough supermajorities can undo basic rights by changing the constitution. No liberal democracy is immune from this, no matter how liberal. The tension between liberalism and democracy is always latent
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Shadi Hamid May 26
Replying to @propornot
But, basically, "human rights" isn't a binary but a continuum, and the level of rights differs considerably across democracies (and across time, i.e. the US now vs. the US in the 50s)
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Shadi Hamid May 26
Replying to @propornot
As for human rights, sure, you have to have some basic rights for democracy to function, i.e. the right to vote, organize parties, free expression. I refer to this as "recourse," which I discuss here:
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Shadi Hamid May 26
Replying to @propornot
We have the term "illiberal democracy" b/c democracies can in fact be illiberal. Also you can have liberalism without democracy. There's a whole political science literature on this. In case it's of interest, it's a key argument in my first book:
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Shadi Hamid retweeted
Kyle Orton May 23
I've had this argument in varying forms with a close friend for more than a year: my knockdown argument, stripped of all idealism, was that he can at least be left alone under liberalism. That, he says, is the problem: regimentation and instruction on how to live would be easier.
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