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Laurie Voss πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΊπŸ‡ΈπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§
Cloudflare is burying the lede here a bit: they have built a cloud platform that costs a third of what AWS costs and can run any language, by compiling it down to WebAssembly and running it in V8 isolates.
We have a cloud computing platform called Workers. Unlike essentially every other cloud computing platform I know of, it doesn’t use containers or virtual machines. We believe that is the future of...
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Laurie Voss πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΊπŸ‡ΈπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ Nov 10
Replying to @seldo
WebAssembly modules are already in the npm registry and interoperable with other JS. There is a potential future, not guaranteed but possible, in which all open-source software written in any language agglomerates into a single giant pool of useful libraries available on npm.
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Laurie Voss πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΊπŸ‡ΈπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ Nov 10
Replying to @seldo
npm transitioned from the package manager for Node to the package manager for JavaScript and now with TypeScript, Electron and mobile transpilers has moved into being a general purpose software development platform.
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Laurie Voss πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΊπŸ‡ΈπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ Nov 10
Replying to @seldo
WebAssembly creates the potential for npm to become the dependency management solution for every programming language. This would be a very unexpected outcome, but then so were the previous two transitions.
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Laurie Voss πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΊπŸ‡ΈπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ Nov 10
Replying to @seldo
The strange thing is: nobody planned this. Google built v8, GitHub built Electron, Facebook built React Native, Microsoft created TypeScript, Mozilla invented WebAssembly and now Cloudflare has built workers. This was nobody's master plan, but the shape is becoming clearer.
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Laurie Voss πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΊπŸ‡ΈπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ Nov 10
Replying to @seldo
I have been speaking all year about the Meyerovich study which says that the availability of open source libraries to achieve the task at hand is the primary reason people pick a programming language. It's why npm's gigantic library is fueling JavaScript's ascent.
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k. rainbolt-greene Nov 10
Replying to @seldo
Apparently Google looked at it but decided against it for security reasons? Or at least I thought I read that on The Orange Site.
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Laurie Voss πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΊπŸ‡ΈπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ Nov 10
Replying to @seldo
What happens when every library in every language is available to every other language via a single mechanism and a unified clearing house? How does software development change when you can use any library anytime?
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Laurie Voss πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΊπŸ‡ΈπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ Nov 10
Replying to @seldo
Needless to say, it's an exciting time.
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Eric Schultz Nov 10
Replying to @seldo
Laurie, I think highly of the work of NPM Inc but should the entire package repository for all software development be run by a single for profit company? That scares the crap out of me.
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Laurie Voss πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΊπŸ‡ΈπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ Nov 10
Replying to @krainboltgreene
Anything on the orange site can be assumed to be wrong.
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Laurie Voss πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΊπŸ‡ΈπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ Nov 10
Replying to @wwahammy
I've spent 5 years trying to think of a practical alternative and not come up with one yet. I remain open to suggestions.
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Eric Schultz Nov 10
Replying to @seldo
I don't know that I have one at hand. I do know with companies like Redis Labs and MongoDB betraying communities, there's an urgency to address this. NPM Inc is an awesome company to date but it's still obligated to serve shareholders.
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Tyler Breisacher Nov 10
Replying to @seldo @wwahammy
You mean other than having other orgs keep copies of it, so that people can switch in the event npm does something bad?
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Laurie Voss πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΊπŸ‡ΈπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ Nov 10
Replying to @wwahammy
The results of governance of other pieces of software through foundations or other mechanisms has not impressed me. There's nothing stopping an open source fork of Redis or Mongo, managed by a social mechanism, becoming the market leader. But it's not happening.
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Laurie Voss πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΊπŸ‡ΈπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ Nov 10
Replying to @tbreisacher @wwahammy
There are tens of thousands of full mirrors of npm. Nobody is worried about the raw data going away.
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Eric Schultz Nov 10
Replying to @seldo
I'm also not impressed by us all depending on a company who is obligated to not consider our needs if it doesn't make their shareholders money. We're all basically taking on massive risks in the hope that NPM's shareholders don't change the rules out from under us.
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Tyler Breisacher Nov 10
Replying to @seldo @wwahammy
I'm almost afraid to ask but what are people worried about?
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Laurie Voss πŸ³οΈβ€πŸŒˆπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΉπŸ‡ΊπŸ‡ΈπŸ‡¬πŸ‡§ Nov 10
Replying to @wwahammy
If npm turned evil there are thousands of mirrors. Anybody could set up a mirror of npm overnight. Our ability to abuse our position is overblown. We are popular because we are over the top paranoid about making sure we never piss of the community.
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Eric Schultz Nov 10
Replying to @seldo @tbreisacher
To be very clear, to date I really think super highly of you and the rest of the people at NPM. I think you're committed to doing the right thing both for the community and for social justice. But it's still a single point of failure ultimately beholden to investors.
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