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Stephen Hicks
& what they reveal about our planet. imaging tectonic plates & quakes . email: s.hicks@soton.ac.uk 🚴🧗🏃
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Stephen Hicks Jan 16
Replying to @Cooper_geo
Nice - hope you settle in well! It seems that you fit in very well to Bristol as a Mac user :)
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ISC Jan 16
, ISC's good supporter, offers a chance to win an Apple Watch by filling in 2 min questionnaire on seismic instruments:
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Stephen Hicks Jan 15
It's always nice to receive big packages of mail sent special delivery from interested members of the public about their earthquake theories ... lots of sheets of paper to read through here. Here is a good answer on this question by :
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Stephen Hicks Jan 15
Cc. - possibly more information here on the Montana crustal thickness?
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DigitalGlobe Jan 14
Spectacular images collected on Jan. 11, 2018 of Anak Krakatoa in rebuilding itself after erupting in December 2018.
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Stephen Hicks Jan 14
Replying to @ISCseism
Bulletin and ISC-EHB for me ... what's GT? 🤔
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Stephen Hicks Jan 14
Many congratulations, Tim!
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Stephen Hicks retweeted
⚒Fumihiko Ikegami🚢 Jan 12
Black beach on the red ocean like this might be a typical landscape of the Earth billions of years ago, during the deposition of Banded Iron Formation. It is extremely rare on the modern Earth and only happens locally for a limited amount of time.
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James Reynolds Jan 12
High res 4K drone footage of Anak after the devastating collapse, major eruption and - you can clearly see the new, shallow crater lake, intense colours in the sea water and major devastation to nearby islands from the tsunami
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Stephen Hicks Jan 11
"Slow slip event" - basically an event where there is movement across a geological fault or tectonic plate boundary, but the movement is so slow, it doesn't register on seismometers. These events are best detected using GPS systems that can track movement over longer timescales.
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Stephen Hicks Jan 11
Pretty clear evidence here showing the effects of a ~25-30 metre-high tsunami on the island that got the head-on hit from the volcano collapse. Wow.
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Øystein Lund Andersen Jan 11
Image-comparison of Anak-Krakatau before and after collapse, showing the major changes to the volcanic Island. First photo captured 5th August and second photo taken by today. 1/3
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James Reynolds Jan 11
Footage from in I shot yesterday and today - remarkable changes at a remarkable
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James Reynolds Jan 11
Got another good view of the new crater lake at - incredible landscape down there
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James Reynolds Jan 11
Another successful and safe day filming at - the was quiet. Today I took the drone higher to catch not only the island but also the amazing color of the sea water
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Stephen Hicks Jan 10
Hey , be sure to check out 's awesome drone images hot off the press from this morning showing the crater lagoon amongst many other fascinating details:
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Stephen Hicks Jan 10
Phew - thanks for letting us know, Alice. Seismo-twitter once again proving its worth!
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Stephen Hicks Jan 10
Replying to @EarthUncutTV
Woooo - remote field observations on demand - thanks! [Currently feeling all warm and empowered whilst stroking my white cat ☺️]
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Stephen Hicks Jan 10
Replying to @fikgm
, any ideas? Or is it just ash?
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Stephen Hicks Jan 10
Replying to @seismo_steve
Volcanologists out there - what are the areas of white layers just above sea level? Is that evidence of hydrothermal alteration?
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