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Stephanie Hurlburt
Salary negotiation delusion I would like to tear down: “I can accept a low salary now- once they see my good work they’ll know I’m worth more and I’ll get lots then!” - Money influences perceived value - One you agree to a value, it is very hard to drastically change perception
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Stephanie Hurlburt 12 Jul 18
Replying to @sehurlburt
- Money influences perceived value If you’re paid more, everything you do is seen in a more valued light, considered more senior, respected more. This is because no one can see the entirety of you- value isn’t objective. Value is *perceived.* This is why marketing is a career.
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Stephanie Hurlburt 12 Jul 18
Replying to @sehurlburt
- Once you agree to a value, it is very hard to drastically change perception This is why they say not to name a number first This is why you shouldn’t disclose previous salary info to future employers (and why it’s illegal to require that disclosure in some states)
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Stephanie Hurlburt 12 Jul 18
Replying to @sehurlburt
Get good money right at the start of that job, and if you aren’t happy with the $ make an exit plan to jump to a new job eventually. Even if you just want a big raise, you’ll need the leverage of other offers to shake that set perceived value (and even then it may not be enough)
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Stephanie Hurlburt 12 Jul 18
Replying to @sehurlburt
I do want to point out there are no hard “rules” to negotiation, no great tricks or easy shortcuts. It’s like learning math— we say memorize the times tables because it’s easier to get someone started fast that way, but real power is in understanding the reasoning behind it.
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Stephanie Hurlburt 12 Jul 18
Replying to @sehurlburt
In fact some of my favorite negotiation stories are when someone is able to drastically change a perceived value that seemed set in stone— but they’re my favorite because doing that takes a lot of skill and deep understanding of negotiation.
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Pooja Gadige 12 Jul 18
Replying to @sehurlburt
I've been practicing the skill of steering the ship of salary negotiation and taking control of the ship when I'm asked about my previous pay cheque, a very common practice in the country I work in. I make gracious but firm effort to get a number from the other side, but in vain.
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Stephanie Hurlburt 12 Jul 18
Replying to @algurlrhythm
It’s good that you try even if you fail to get them to name a number first, because the longer you talk to them before naming a number the more educated you can get about what a good offer might be, & more time you have to market yourself so they’re onboard with a higher number
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Stephanie Hurlburt 12 Jul 18
Replying to @algurlrhythm
Even the act of negotiating (regardless of who names a number first) increases your perceived value and lets you make more money, you’ll seem less desperate and more in demand.
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