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SeekTruthFromFacts
实事求是。A lifelong student of culture, language, politics & theology in the Anglosphere & Sinosphere. Anon because Beijing expels/gaols critics.
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SeekTruthFromFacts Sep 12
People in the UK have always been aware that it is a Union of nations, not states. Nobody in Austria would regard even Carinthia as a separate nation. So you're 'comparing apples with oranges'.
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SeekTruthFromFacts Sep 12
Replying to @BritComMil
The delay of over a month was partly due to Gen. MacArthur's insistence that nowhere else could be liberated until he steamed into Tokyo, which took two weeks.
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SeekTruthFromFacts Sep 7
Whatever makes you think that Beijing 'allowed' the DPRK to have nuclear weapons?! If they could have prevented it, they would have.
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SeekTruthFromFacts Sep 4
The language of "truth commission" comes from Bishop Desmond Tutu and Nelson Mandela, not George Orwell: The basic idea of an open, honest & impartial inquiry into civil strife & human abuses in HK is a good one. So the Communists will surely water it down
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SeekTruthFromFacts Sep 4
The most famous example is surely South Africa, where the Truth & Reconciliation Commission played a vital role in Nelson Mandela's strategy to reunite the nation. I severely doubt that the Communists would allow an impartial & open inquiry, but the concept is a good one.
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SeekTruthFromFacts Sep 4
'Truth (& reconciliation) commission' is the standard term for a thorough, public investigation into past civil strife & human rights abuses: It's the language of Nelson Mandela, not Orwell. But would Ms Lam appoint impartial commissioners? I doubt it.
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SeekTruthFromFacts Sep 3
Why on Netflix, where only a few can see it? Why not in a series produced & aired by a public broadcaster, such as ARD, BBC, or TVE?
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SeekTruthFromFacts Sep 3
Replying to @Comparativist
I'm not sure she was aiming at popularity so much as *tidiness*. Kidnapping booksellers off the street is messy. Ms Lam genuinely wants Hong Kong to have rule of law because she wants the bureaucracy to run smoothly and the ELAB meant the CCP could silence dissidents 'tidily'.
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SeekTruthFromFacts Aug 21
While TrainSimWorld appears to be fun for frustrated drivers, anyone who fancies being an amateur railway engineer would be much better off playing (and creating) Simutrans: For example, check out 's GB rail map:
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SeekTruthFromFacts Aug 21
Replying to @afewpiecesofme
Surveying Doxbridge chapels, which are as much about college rituals as Christianity, is a terrible way to spot wider trends. Church attendance in England has always been higher among upper-middle-class social groups. And they're (rightly) subsidized from public funds.
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SeekTruthFromFacts Aug 21
Replying to @twlldun @QDaragh and 3 others
All these questions can be answered using the handy converter provided by the Register Standards Bureau:
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SeekTruthFromFacts Aug 21
This is basically the Oxbridge approach. Some terms at Oxford, I had only one hour a week of timetabled academic activities. The rest of the week was supposed to be in the library/on the word processor preparing for that tutorial.
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SeekTruthFromFacts Aug 20
Replying to @LunaNLin
Some of them show signs of having been used for other purposes at an early stage. Possibly hacked then sold on much later.
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SeekTruthFromFacts Aug 19
This would only really be a problem in the archaic first-past-the-post system used in the US. It reminds me of those people who looked at Chinese typewriters and thought China couldn't have PCs! There are several voting systems that can mitigate fixed voting blocs.
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SeekTruthFromFacts Aug 17
Replying to @SGM63 @John_Hempton
I've witnessed an anti-government protest in Beijing and had friends detained, and still have nightmares about it. But that makes me determined to protect the rights of protestors in free countries. If we expel them because of their non-violent opinions, we are the authoritarians
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SeekTruthFromFacts Aug 17
Replying to @John_Hempton @SGM63
The key thing about demos is that they're only useful for the powerless. That's why you don't often see Amazon execs or Beijing cadres holding handmade placards! So the fact that the Communists are shouting on the street (rather than whispering in vice-chancellors' ears) is good.
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SeekTruthFromFacts Aug 16
Replying to @SGM63 @John_Hempton
The video in Sydney shows people saying "support Hong Kong police". They are not inciting or using violence. But patient police work is likely to show consulate involvement in organising the protest and that should be covered by Australia's helpful new anti-subversion laws.
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SeekTruthFromFacts Aug 16
Replying to @SGM63 @John_Hempton
I agree it's about democracy vs authoritarianism. But democracy is about listening to views you disagree with, not banning them! If violence is used or incited (as in Queensland), then punish individuals through the courts. Don't impose CCP-style collective punishment.
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SeekTruthFromFacts Aug 16
Cathay are 30% owned by Air China (i.e. the central government) and are flag carrier for part of China. They are not just any private company. The CCP's totalitarian bullying is wrong, but there's no way the airline can or should boycott China. Maybe Swire should sell up though.
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SeekTruthFromFacts Aug 16
Replying to @BaldingsWorld
Google were forced out of Mainland China because they would not accept the CCP's demands. Putting them in the same category as Apple, who have never said no to Zhongnanhai, is unjust. (Yes, they sketched out a censored Project ?Dragonfly, but in the end made the right decision)
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