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Gabby.Lewis Mar 13
A1: because Iโ€™m preservice, I havenโ€™t had to teach a lot of math yet, but I always remember getting excited for math when I was younger by playing games as a class.
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Shannon Jones May 8
A4 I have used "spider web" conversations on almost a weekly basis with students and I feel this fits nicely into the suggestions presented in the table.
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Alexa Fulmer Mar 13
A4: when we differentiate before the student even tries. Giving materials to assist instead of having them available I let students choose if and what material they would like.
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Abigail Stverak Mar 13
A4. If teachers are calling on the very first person to raise there hand and answer a question, students can then feel like they are not fast enough or good enough to answer the question, when maybe it just took them a little longer to process it.
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Erin Edgington Mar 13
Educators have the power to change - student perceptions, instructional practices, opportunity...I am always discouraged by the number of pre-service teachers who share negative experiences and lack of self-confidence in mathematics. Together, we can change the narrative
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Erin Edgington Mar 13
A4 When we diminish task rigor, and "spoon feed" students, we send the message that we do not believe in their capacity to be successful in mathematics. This has lasting impacts on their self-efficacy and identity
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Allie Elsasser Mar 13
A4: how a teacher may respond verbally or non-verbally to the S sharing their strategy aloud. A Ts face, tone and excitement may change (unknowingly) when different students or strategies are shared
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Katie Johnston Mar 13
A4: Anytime a student feels inferior to another, they are receiving a message that they are not as capable. Comparing students to one another & pointing out mistakes in a negative way are 2 examples I have seen a lot.
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Gabby.Lewis Mar 13
A4: I always had my answers and process of solving a problem compared to others and that lowered my confidence when it came to my math ability.
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Alexa Fulmer Mar 13
A4: when points are taken off strictly becauseit is messy work. When points are taken a S is working through a process and may make mistakes. When only the product is looked at and not the process.
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Katie Johnston Mar 13
A6: Since tracking seems so normal to me (always had it), I really need to be cautious about what math is going to look like in my future classroom. I never want any of my students to feel less than, so keeping tonightโ€™s conversation in mind will be extremely helpful.
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Liv Mar 13
A5 Your colleagues are your resources. We're all in this together and effective collaboration and commitment from educators across all grade levels helps ensure students are receiving the math education they deserve.
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Douglas H. Clements May 8
Well, goodbye everyone! It was a pleasure. See our work on . Dr. Doug Clements Douglas.Clements@du.edu
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Erin Edgington Mar 13
A2 I was tracked, however, if you are not "missing out" then this feels like an acceptable approach. Oh how my eyes have opened to the inequity and gaps this creates for students.
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Ms. Senstad ๐ŸŽ Mar 13
A2: I was tracked as a student, into the "challenging" courses. As a studnet that gave me a very positive mathematics identity, and I generally enjoyed it, except when I didn't understand. Then I felt as though I was failing since I was "supposed to be good at math"
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Shannon Jones May 8
A2 I really don't know enough about EF to speak on it. I was hoping to sit in on the chat and learn from others.
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Sohnia Malik Dec 12
A3 Some students feel comfortable sharing with a partner or in a small group instead of whole class. Also, let students know in advance that they will share. This helps them prepare
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Ms. Senstad ๐ŸŽ Mar 13
A4: I believe that students are recieveing messages that they are not as capable whenever they are not permitted to really work with problems, such as when the teacher lectures and they asnwer. All students should be given challenging "minds-on" content to work with.
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Ms. Senstad ๐ŸŽ Mar 13
A5: I really love the 8 Effective Teaching Practices. I try to integrate them into my lessons, and hope to bring them wherever I go. They allign so well with the equity-based teaching practices, which I also find absolutely essential!
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Kirsten Danisavich May 8
Q1 They support each other. They go hand in hand. Developing EF will improve math. And, carefully crafted math activities can intentionally improve EF.
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