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Scott Young
My book, ULTRALEARNING, is out now:
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Scott Young 13h
Replying to @ResilientSubho
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Scott Young Sep 14
Replying to @caneatsmacaroon
no, I haven't
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Scott Young Sep 14
Replying to @ScottHYoung
It does have diminishing returns, so I don't find it super useful past the first month, but the good news is that this normally gives you enough building blocks to start chatting with people in conjunction with Google Translate + dictionaries.
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Scott Young Sep 14
Picking up a bit of Japanese for my upcoming trip to Tokyo. Using Pimsleur again for the first time in five years, and I'm happy to say that it holds up. Much better than pretty much any other resource for learning the basics of a language from scratch.
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Scott Young Sep 14
Replying to @ZachWeiner
I'd be surprised if reading any book improved someone's life far, far more than the cost of reading it ($ + time), at least in expectation. Why can't reading a book be like exercise, helpful, but probably you need to read 100s over a lifetime to make huge differences?
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Scott Young Sep 13
Replying to @ScottHYoung
Ultimately, time is limited, so the learn-or-hire decision is always going to involve trade-offs. There's no shame in avoiding learning something, but sometimes there can be an advantage to doing so.
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Scott Young Sep 13
Replying to @ScottHYoung
As an example, I've been dabbling with doing Chinese narration of some of my content. Obviously this isn't super efficient, but if I can get decent enough at it, it will enable opportunities that won't come from hiring someone else to read it for me.
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Scott Young Sep 13
Replying to @ScottHYoung
Finally, does learning this new skill open up new doors? Are there future projects and roles you're interested in that would be enabled by learning a new skill, that wouldn't be available if you merely outsourced them?
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Scott Young Sep 13
Replying to @ScottHYoung
This doesn't mean I'll never get help, but just that if I remove myself from the research process entirely, my writing will be worse off for it. Same with speaking/presenting/marketing. I might get help, but I can't remove myself from it without taking a hit to my main work.
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Scott Young Sep 13
Replying to @ScottHYoung
Third, how does acquiring this skill enhance the primary value you deliver through your work? I often choose to learn when I expect there will by synergies from adding to my skills with my core work. As a writer, for instance, I generally prefer to do (most) my own research.
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Scott Young Sep 13
Replying to @ScottHYoung
Second, do you need to be an expert, or just know enough to manage an expert? I'm not a good enough accountant to provide advice, but I know enough to discuss things intelligently with an accountant. Same for writing Wordpress plugins, managing a server or editing videos.
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Scott Young Sep 13
Replying to @ScottHYoung
At first, the easiest response is: do you want to learn it? Life is short, work is busy. You don't need to be good at everything, and sometimes getting someone else to do it will free yourself up for learning how to do something else.
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Scott Young Sep 13
Should you learn something new, or outsource it to someone else? This is a situation that comes up a lot in work and life. Do you learn accounting--or hire an accountant? Write a script or hire a programmer? Do your own drywall or hire a contractor? My thoughts...
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Scott Young Sep 12
Replying to @bencasnocha
I missed the "at" in that sentence the first read through. Now all I can imagine are thousands of screeching bats filling a cavernous Googleplex.
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Scott Young Sep 12
Replying to @Montebello
My take: Know what giving 110% really feels like. Then use that mode sparingly.
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Scott Young Sep 12
Replying to @Hybridtupel
Also Twitter threads. :)
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Scott Young Sep 12
Replying to @BatteryHorse
Concept mapping isn't bad, the problem is that it doesn't involve retrieval so it's going to be less effective if the goal is long-term retention or recall. CM helps to make sense of things, but if you're doing it open-book it probably won't help as much as self-testing.
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Scott Young Sep 12
Replying to @thepericulum
In my case, I used speed reading, then stopped (naturally, without reading research on effectiveness). I never did concept mapping exactly, but I did similar things. I liked them, but in high-intensity projects like the MIT Challenge it was clear they couldn't be the bulk of time
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Scott Young Sep 12
Replying to @thepericulum
"Worked for you" is a tricky idea. Our lives aren't controlled experiments, so sometimes you'll do something because you like it, and only later realize it didn't have high effectiveness. Or you'll find something you use better instead.
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Scott Young Sep 12
Replying to @Hybridtupel
True. And I will say more in blog posts. In book form, though, my goal was useful idea density. Most people don't finish books, so every page is precious. Long diatribes against a method most weren't using already aren't helpful (unless the deficit recommends something else)
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