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Scientific American
The authoritative source for the science discoveries and technology innovations that matter.
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Scientific American 35m
Don't miss out on our Black Friday Sale 🎉 Save 20% on Scientific American subscriptions, single issues, special editions, and more:
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Scientific American 2h
Empathy may sometimes come with an extra dose of stress, a study suggests. This and other research shows that too much emotional intelligence could be a bad thing.
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Scientific American 3h
Could a rogue nation alter clouds to combat global warming? Two experiments have sparked an international debate over geoengineering
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Scientific American 4h
This bizarre object is unlike anything normally found in the Solar System.
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Scientific American 5h
Millions, billions, trillions: How to make sense of numbers in the news
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Scientific American 6h
Cetaceans’ big brains are linked to their rich social life
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Scientific American 6h
Will Thanksgiving leftovers save you from Black Friday impulse buys? Research suggests that high-tryptophan foods—like our favorite holiday classics—might lead to less impulsive shopping.
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Scientific American 7h
How science-backed companies can place transparency at the heart of their business and profit [Sponsored]
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Scientific American 14h
Black Friday Sale 🎉 Treat yourself to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology. Save 20% on subscriptions, single issues, special editions, and more:
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Scientific American 19h
Does turkey really make you sleepy? The drowsiness we experience after a hearty Thanksgiving meal is usually blamed on the amino acid tryptophan, which the bird supposedly has an extra helping of. Or does it? Find out more in this video:
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Scientific American 21h
It takes a lot of brain power—and many parts of the brain—to fully give thanks [Video]
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Scientific American 22h
The brain releases feel-good chemicals after meals—even unappetizing ones.
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Scientific American 23h
Treat yourself to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology. Save 20% on subscriptions, single issues, special editions, and more:
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Scientific American 24h
Blog: Every year on Thanksgiving, we reflect on and express our feelings of gratitude. How does this practice help make our lives—and our relationships—happier and healthier?
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Scientific American Nov 23
'Tis the season of eating. Explore this delightful interactive graphic on seasonal food trends.
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Scientific American Nov 23
If you have an opportunity this Thanksgiving to have a productive conversation about controversial issues, here are some communication strategies supported by social science. (By )
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Scientific American Nov 23
Don’t crack under pressure! Explore the scientific—and sometimes sleazy—secrets to win at this year’s wishbone pull [Video]
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Scientific American Nov 23
Scientists genetically engineer a form of gluten-free wheat, which could make it safe for celiacs to consume (By )
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Scientific American Nov 22
What's the secret to a successful Thanksgiving? Believing in free will, according to researchers.
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Scientific American Nov 22
Maryn McKenna’s () book “Big Chicken” looks at poultry’s effect on antibiotic resistance (By )
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