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Sarah Zhang
staff writer , eukaryote // email: szhang@theatlantic.com
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Sarah Zhang retweeted
T. Christian Miller 3h
This story is an excellent example of tracing an ideological virus to its roots - in this case, anti-vaccine claims and genetic testing. by
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Sarah Zhang retweeted
Sara Cherny 7h
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Sarah Zhang 8h
Anti-vax doctors have been using 23andMe tests to grant vaccine exemptions. I traced it all back to a single paper from 2008. In hindsight, one of the authors was blistering about his own paper: "It’s just not even a valid study by today’s methodology"
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Sarah Zhang retweeted
Debbie Kennett May 19
BREAKING NEWS. GEDmatch have updated their terms and conditions as of 18th May. Everyone is now opted out and must opt in to use the database. There's also a new public sharing option which allows you to opt out of law enforcement matching.
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Sarah Zhang May 17
Replying to @sarahzhang
also, the International Astronomical Union actually made it a rule that Jupiter's moons can only be named after the Roman god's lovers and descendants
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Sarah Zhang May 17
"Yes, outer space is distant and cold and mostly empty. But after centuries of study and exploration, it is brimming with artifacts of our culture, politics, and other traditions"
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Sarah Zhang May 16
Replying to @sarahzhang
perhaps you would also be interested: Mao's Four Pests Campaign
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Sarah Zhang May 16
I wrote about when Soviets tried to eradicate the plague by killing all the gerbils and marmots and squirrels
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Sarah Zhang retweeted
Alan Taylor May 15
Who wore it better?
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Sarah Zhang May 15
Replying to @sarahzhang
There are ways to justify all these cases, but it's pretty clear we're on a slippery slope that started with catching serial killers and will end with....what?
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Sarah Zhang May 15
Replying to @sarahzhang
This week, we find out GEDmatch gave an exception to its terms of service so police could investigate a violent assault
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Sarah Zhang May 15
Replying to @sarahzhang
In March, genetic genealogy was used to arrest a woman who abandoned her baby as a teen. The forensics company justified it because police consider it a homicide (Also consider: the history of investigating women who've had miscarriages in U.S.)
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Sarah Zhang May 15
Replying to @sarahzhang
In January, BuzzFeed reported another genealogy site had been quietly working with the FBI
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Sarah Zhang May 15
Let's review what has happened since genetic genealogy was used to catch the Golden State Killer last year. GSK was a notorious serial killer and rapist. We're told that the powerful new technique will only be used for homicides and sexual assaults
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Sarah Zhang May 14
Replying to @marinakoren
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Sarah Zhang May 14
Replying to @sarahzhang
i had two (2) peanut butter blossom cookies for breakfast today
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Sarah Zhang May 14
down with the tyranny of breakfast food
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Sarah Zhang May 13
Replying to @sarahzhang
There are also stories of a single donor passing along rare genetic conditions
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Sarah Zhang May 13
Replying to @sarahzhang
Why limit the number of kids per donor? The usual rationale is to prevent accidental incest. The odds are pretty remote, but not zero A guy posted on reddit earlier this year saying he and his girlfriend took 23andMe tests, and uh, you can guess
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Sarah Zhang May 13
Replying to @sarahzhang
It's super unclear how he would know he has 114 kids, but part of the problem is nobody knows how many donor-conceived kids are born in the U.S. every year
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