Twitter | Search | |
Samuel Sinyangwe
1.5 million people currently in prison. 60% work full-time, at ~$0.14/hr. Their forced labor maintains the prisons incarcerating them. (1/x)
Reply Retweet Like More
Samuel Sinyangwe Aug 20
Replying to @samswey
If forced/unpaid prison labor ceased, the cost of paying this many workers minimum wage to upkeep the prisons would break the system/budget.
Reply Retweet Like
verbatim411 Aug 20
Replying to @samswey
Many there for selling marijuana received long sentences and now mostly whites are making big profits off of the same drug in some states.
Reply Retweet Like
Samuel Sinyangwe Aug 20
Replying to @samswey
In this way, prisons are currently dependent on forced and unpaid/underpaid labor to even operate. This system of modern slavery is toxic.
Reply Retweet Like
verbatim411 Aug 20
Replying to @samswey
Many are coerced into taking plea deals. Public Defenders b/c of large case load don't always do their job so push pleas on their clients.
Reply Retweet Like
verbatim411 Aug 20
Replying to @samswey
Judges ask defendants if anyone coerced them i/t taking a pleas deal,can't say no b/c if judge doesn't accept plea, DA will go double t/time
Reply Retweet Like
verbatim411 Aug 20
Replying to @samswey
Decreases the number of Blacks in job market, destroys families, and eliminates a large segment of the voting population.
Reply Retweet Like
Samuel Sinyangwe Aug 20
Replying to @samswey
Your state's department of corrections has the authority to decide the wages prisoners are paid and whether or not they're required to work.
Reply Retweet Like
Samuel Sinyangwe Aug 20
Replying to @samswey
While closing 13th Amendment loophole would abolish prison slavery nationwide, state depts of corrections/legislatures can act right now.
Reply Retweet Like
Samuel Sinyangwe Aug 20
Replying to @samswey
But who's lobbying state department of corrections administrators or board members? Private prison industry, correctional officers unions...
Reply Retweet Like
verbatim411 Aug 20
Replying to @samswey
Billions of dollars is being made, while providing jobs for many whites in rural Pennsylvania an other areas.
Reply Retweet Like
202-224-3121 CALL Aug 20
Replying to @samswey
So very unjust 😟 And non-criminal undocumented folks are being held in max prison like conditions. All part of the prison industrial complex
Reply Retweet Like
Margot Atwell Aug 20
Replying to @samswey
Any suggestions for how citizens who are disgusted by this can make our voices heard productively?
Reply Retweet Like
David Menschel Aug 20
Replying to @samswey
in a # of states the prisons don't benefit from the labor. In AZ e.g. there's an independent corporation that benefits 1/
Reply Retweet Like
David Menschel Aug 20
Replying to @samswey
Arizona Correctional Industries provides private corps with low cost labor; profits go to the states general fund not the prisons.
Reply Retweet Like
David Menschel Aug 20
Replying to @samswey
The original impetus for ACI was to create "programming" for inmates at no cost to state. That's why it's Independent.
Reply Retweet Like
David Menschel Aug 20
Replying to @samswey
Idea was that the rehabilitative work "programs" would only survive if they were cost neutral. That's why ACI is independent.
Reply Retweet Like
David Menschel Aug 20
Replying to @samswey
to put it differently, in some places prisons don't need the labor and it was rehabilitation proponents that fought for it.
Reply Retweet Like
bobby hill Aug 20
Replying to @samswey
All of this done largely to the low IQ, cognitively impaired, and or already highly traumatized, disenfranchised section of the population.
Reply Retweet Like
Samuel Sinyangwe Aug 20
Replying to @davidminpdx
Correctional Industry labor is only about 7% of all prison labor. 93% work maintaining the prison (cleaning, etc), not producing products.
Reply Retweet Like