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sailor mercury
always a good day to re-bring up this research: girls score higher than boys in math if tests are graded w/o names
Early educational experiences have a quantifiable effect on the courses students choose later, a study shows.
The New York Times The New York Times @nytimes
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Denebola Interactive 9 Aug 17
Replying to @sailorhg @eevee
I have always known this to be true. Girls in school were always intimidatingly better at math than me.
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eevee 9 Aug 17
i seem to recall some Actual Data showing that girls test better at math /on average/ until around third grade or so
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Black Lives Matter 9 Aug 17
In 8th grade I had a black teacher who encouraged me in math/science. 9th grade: white man who told me i was stupid girl all year. A to F.
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cam_colton 9 Aug 17
Replying to @sailorhg
also, at elite uni where I work, women leave STEM majors if they don't get As and Bs. Men are stubborn and stay, even if they get Cs and Ds.
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Willa is Social Media Distancing 9 Aug 17
Replying to @sailorhg @_AJCousins
In the early 90s, my very tough calculus teacher insisted we use fake names on our tests. Always new she was a boss; this just confirms it.
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😷 That Oklahoma Kid 9 Aug 17
Replying to @sailorhg @_AJCousins
I'm confused. How do you subjectively grade a math test?!
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Angela Bassa 9 Aug 17
The authors do not speculate on how effect is expressed (e.g., increased scrutiny, less partial credit, more of “show your work,” etc.).
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Ariel Caplan 5️⃣0️⃣⛰📖 9 Aug 17
Replying to @sailorhg
That looks really helpful to pull out of my back pocket on a rainy day. Thanks for sharing.
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Michael Anes 9 Aug 17
"But to claim...that culture has greater influence than biology simply isn't true" says
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Michael Anes 9 Aug 17
Among other very strong statements, countered by plenty of studies...
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