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Kelly Hills 18 Oct 17
Replying to @pearson
Like, there ARE interesting sociocultural aspects to pain & injury, yes. BUT THEY DO NOT EXIST LIKE THIS IN ANY WAY, SHAPE, OR FORM.
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Kelly Hills 18 Oct 17
Replying to @pearson
This is just so much to unpack, and is teaching students so many horribly racist things beyond "how to manage pain in patients."
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Kelly Hills 18 Oct 17
Replying to @pearson
For example, saying that Asians who complain about pain have poor social skills encourages students to dismiss anything they don't like
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Tanika Spates, MPH 19 Oct 17
considered best practice for “cultural competency;” research based but still a generalization, thus saying “some” & “may” re: belief systems informed by culture/tradition ie “fatalism.” Comes across racist but attempts respecting culture to deliver appropriate care.
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Kelly Hills 19 Oct 17
Except 1) it makes blanket generalizations rooted in racist ideology and 2) that kind of blanketing results in substandard care for patients
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Kelly Hills 19 Oct 17
Let's look at the Native American example. There are a lot of problems with it. It begins by establishing that indigenous patients will lie
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Kelly Hills 19 Oct 17
Replying to @rocza
So it's telling nurses to not believe or trust patient reports of pain, saying they chose a "sacred number" rather than "real" pain
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Kelly Hills 18 Oct 17
Replying to @LRwriter @pearson
Well, from that edition. But will they be removing it from ALL textbooks that have it? @SawtoothEKG found it in another (10th Edition, too)
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Kelly Hills 18 Oct 17
Oh, there are LOTS of sources about cultural differences in medicine. It's a fascinating topic. It's not THAT racist crap, tho.
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Kelly Hills 18 Oct 17
For example, yes, minorities tend to report higher pain numbers. Correlation: minorities tend to be shorted on pain medication to begin with
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