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Reuters Institute
1.Public service media struggle to reach younger & less educated audiences. As a result, they fall short of the ambition to provide a universal news service, according to a new report by & . Key findings here
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Reuters Institute Sep 10
Replying to @risj_oxford
2. The report uses survey data from the and focuses on public service media from 8 European countries: ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง BBC ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ธ RTVE ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡น RAI ๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ท TF, RF ๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ฎ Yle ๐Ÿ‡ฉ๐Ÿ‡ช ARD, ZDF, DRadio ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ท ERT ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฟ ฤŒT & ฤŒRo
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Reuters Institute Sep 10
Replying to @risj_oxford
3. Public service media covered by the report have a serious strategic challenge: they struggle to reach beyond the old & educated citizens who watch them offline. The size of the additional audiences they reach online is very small. This chart shows the extent of the problem
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Reuters Institute Sep 10
Replying to @BBCNews
4. Facebook & YouTube are more widely named as sources of online news by young people than most of the public broadcasters covered by the report. As this chart shows, is the only public broadcaster with a higher reach among young audiences online than offline
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Reuters Institute Sep 10
Replying to @risj_oxford
5. This problem is getting worse for most of the public service media in our sample. As this chart shows, weekly online news reach for people under 25 has declined since 2016 in most of the organisations covered by the report
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Reuters Institute Sep 10
Replying to @risj_oxford
6. People over 55 account for about half of total weekly reach of the news brands covered by the report. These are the percentages in 5 countries: 52% ๐Ÿ‡ฉ๐Ÿ‡ช ARD, ZDF, DRadio 49% ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡น RAI 45% ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง BBC 42% ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฟ ฤŒT & ฤŒRo 40% ๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ฎ Yle More details on ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฟ ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡น in the chart.
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Reuters Institute Sep 10
Replying to @risj_oxford
7. In every country covered, public service news is less widely used by those with limited formal education. A very small percentage of these people follow public service news online. Especially in these countries: 8% ๐Ÿ‡ซ๐Ÿ‡ท TF, RF 9% ๐Ÿ‡ช๐Ÿ‡ธ RTVE 11% ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡น RAI 13%๐Ÿ‡ฉ๐Ÿ‡ช ARD, ZDF, DRadio
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Reuters Institute Sep 10
Replying to @risj_oxford
8. Most of the public service news outlets covered by the report are widely used and highly trusted. They tend to cater almost equally to people with and without populist attitudes, as this chart shows
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Reuters Institute Sep 10
Replying to @risj_oxford
9. However, public broadcasters are often less trusted by people with populist attitudes. The only exception is ๐Ÿ‡ฎ๐Ÿ‡นRAI, which is equally trusted by populists and non populists, as this chart shows
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Reuters Institute Sep 10
Replying to @risj_oxford
10. The challenges highlighted here will only grow more pronounced with the move to an even more digital news environment. We hope our research will help shape the debate on the future of public service media. You can find the report in this link
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Reuters Institute Sep 10
Replying to @annisch
11. More insights on the report in this thread by lead author
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Reuters Institute Sep 10
Replying to @annisch @rasmus_kleis
12. โ€œThe challenges facing public service media news provision are much bigger than is commonly acknowledged. If public service media do not respond, they face the risk of irrelevance to much of the public,โ€ says co-author in this thread
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Sue Newhook Sep 11
looking forward to reading this but a bit disappointed to see that all the countries studied are in Europe... ๐Ÿ‡จ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ˜ข
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Reuters Institute Sep 11
Replying to @suenew @annisch and 9 others
Sorry Sue - the next best we can offer you is the Canada section of our which does include the reach of a number of media outlets in English and French:
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Sue Newhook Sep 11
thanks - I read, enjoyed and used this in a summer MJ class :)
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Dr David D-Gyimah Sep 11
In reflective practitioner mode, having worked for outlets which served 18-35s e.g. BBC Reportage & Channel One (av age of VJs was 24) young audiences were deserting b4 new platforms became available. If you keep on doing what you're doing, you'll keep on getting what you get.
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Richard Sambrook Sep 11
Replying to @viewmagazine
Great pic - where are they all now?!
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Alex Murray Sep 11
Replying to @sambrook @viewmagazine
Richard Griffiths was my first boss (at startup VirtueTV in 2000), taught me so much about being self-op/VJ producer. He's now a VP at Huawei by looks of things
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Dr David D-Gyimah Sep 11
Replying to @leguape @sambrook
Yep good man Richard. We've kept in touch. I remember when he did the Madonna stream and FCP 1 had just been released. He was always at the cutting edge.
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Alex Murray Sep 11
Replying to @viewmagazine @sambrook
Some of those things back then still feel groundbreaking now. Donโ€™t miss overnight rendering for fcp & uploads over ISDN. But we rarely made mistakes because of it.
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Dr David D-Gyimah Sep 11
Replying to @leguape @sambrook
56k modems and the crackles, and working to economies. It heralded a beginning untainted. We relished the divorce and independence from established outlets. Our smallish footprint allowed us to make mistakes and learn. And we adhered to a sort of selflessness of storytelling.
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