Twitter | Search | |
Richard G. Clegg
I am a lecturer in Networks at Queen Mary University of London and an amateur Scuba instructor. I find it best these activities are not performed concurrently.
14,430
Tweets
488
Following
581
Followers
Tweets
Richard G. Clegg Jul 19
Lots of places doing networking in London which is close by. Are you on the Cambridge Networks News mailing list? Good for complex networks. Also London networks mailing list though that is more focused on internet.
Reply Retweet Like
Richard G. Clegg Jul 19
Replying to @AndyGuest73 @beatonna
That's it.
Reply Retweet Like
Richard G. Clegg Jul 18
Replying to @LovelyLee_G @beatonna
That is what I was trying to remember.
Reply Retweet Like
Richard G. Clegg Jul 18
Replying to @beatonna
I used to sing this as a child. "how does your garden grow? With ???? bells and ??? shells and pretty maids all in a row". Can't recall all the words.
Reply Retweet Like
Richard G. Clegg Jul 18
Replying to @ThreadsAplenty
I had a different cover. My reckless (now deceased) uncle was forever buying me these 70s tastic books about ghosts, UFOs and the unknown. I had horrible nightmares and I am pretty sure my parents asked him to stop. That book was so scary as a kid.
Reply Retweet Like
Richard G. Clegg Jul 18
Replying to @narnolddd @Shugars
So important -- we are networks people, we need to welcome new researchers into our community.
Reply Retweet Like
Richard G. Clegg retweeted
Naomi Arnold Jul 18
Can confirm - was ever so slightly shy going to this year’s NetSci as no one else from QMUL was going (and was my first time in the US), and was the friendliest and most welcoming person ever! 💛
Reply Retweet Like
Richard G. Clegg Jul 18
The RJ Barker dark parka?
Reply Retweet Like
Richard G. Clegg Jul 18
Next level -- market your own coat range the RJ Barker Parka.
Reply Retweet Like
Richard G. Clegg Jul 18
Replying to @dedbutdrmng
I've also had drinks described as nutty in flavour.... never "pork scratchingsy" though -- so they can't do all pub snacks yet.
Reply Retweet Like
Richard G. Clegg Jul 18
Replying to @aptshadow
I bet if you just ignore it and publish volume 2 anyway you will quickly be provided with a fan sourced list of inconsistencies. :-)
Reply Retweet Like
Richard G. Clegg Jul 18
I would have said this. In the UK system the british library used to get a copy of each (too many now but it is purely financial that they don't do this). The thesis can in principle be borrowed by inter library loan.
Reply Retweet Like
Richard G. Clegg Jul 17
*nod* In that particular case the editor attached a "feel free to ignore those citations" note.
Reply Retweet Like
Richard G. Clegg Jul 17
Often reviewer suggestions spot significant omissions. On the other side of the fence I've had reviewers try to insist on inclusion of 4 totally irrelevant articles (making it clear who the reviewer was) and quite amazingly a more irrelevant article by his brother!
Reply Retweet Like
Richard G. Clegg Jul 17
Fields of research differ sufficiently that normal practice in one is not normal practice in another. In my field I would be cross but emailing a friendly "Hey X, read your interesting article, looks like we agree on this, here is my article Y which might interest you."
Reply Retweet Like
Richard G. Clegg Jul 17
I can see this must seem much more hurtful if the article is about an extremely specific topic easy to Google search without a huge literature.
Reply Retweet Like
Richard G. Clegg Jul 17
Publication is already fraught with referees wanting to boost their citation count by saying "you missed my article" (when their article is barely relevant). This happens to me regularly. I can't imagine journals being keen on allowing post publication extra citations.
Reply Retweet Like
Richard G. Clegg Jul 17
I imagine things vary hugely between fields. For me (computer science and applied maths) a literature search would involve the most famous publication venues and related highly cited work in Google scholar. But I imagine this is very upsetting for you having done the work.
Reply Retweet Like
Richard G. Clegg Jul 17
... missing references to prior art is unfortunate but very very common. There is a long history of famous ideas in papers only later being spotted in literature decades old.
Reply Retweet Like
Richard G. Clegg Jul 17
.... But as a referee it is very unlikely I would know about the thesis anyway. Once the paper is published it is published - end of story unless the paper is sufficiently incorrect as to require retraction...
Reply Retweet Like