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History of Leeds | James Rhodes
Unofficial Leeds propaganda account. Passionate about Leeds, its history, its people & its sports teams. “On this day in Leeds” book coming out in 2019.
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History of Leeds | James Rhodes 1h
Replying to @HiddenYorkshire
Wow. When will this be?
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History of Leeds | James Rhodes 2h
Looking forward to this.
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History of Leeds | James Rhodes retweeted
B&W Thornton 2h
Jack the Ripper and women as victims Free Thinking Historians and Dr Kate Lister from the twitter account join Tue 26 Feb 2019 22:00
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History of Leeds | James Rhodes 2h
Replying to @AnneQuinton
😂
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History of Leeds | James Rhodes 2h
Not aware of any but I agree. Are you as good at sculpture as you are at portraiture? 😊
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History of Leeds | James Rhodes 3h
You're welcome. Enjoyed your interview with the cemetery volunteer. Fascinating history there.
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History of Leeds | James Rhodes retweeted
History of Leeds | James Rhodes 15h
OTD in 1867, the first two lion statues were unveiled outside . They were carved from Portland stone by William Day Kayworth Jr and modelled on lions in London Zoo. The other two were erected on 7th June 1867. They cost £550. 1/2
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History of Leeds | James Rhodes 8h
It is a theory, nothing more, but there are several Penda- derived place names in Whinmoor. The excellent has made a short film about it.
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History of Leeds | James Rhodes 8h
Replying to @DoctorT1992
Thank you. 😀
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History of Leeds | James Rhodes 9h
Replying to @DoctorT1992
The subjunctive would imply that the possible existence of such a rule is purely theoretical. The fact that such a rule could be, or could have been, created means the indicative is ok in that context (imho). "If I were you" (impossible) vs "If I was wearing a hat" (possible).
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History of Leeds | James Rhodes 13h
Replying to @Jud1960
Possibly inspired by Landseer's lions in Trafalgar Square which were sculpted around the and time.
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History of Leeds | James Rhodes 13h
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History of Leeds | James Rhodes 15h
Replying to @rh0desy
The pair closest to Calverley Street survived being bombed during WW2 & there are various legends associated with the lions, including that they come alive when the Town Hall clock strikes midnight (or thirteen, in other versions of the myth!). 2/2
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History of Leeds | James Rhodes 15h
OTD in 1867, the first two lion statues were unveiled outside . They were carved from Portland stone by William Day Kayworth Jr and modelled on lions in London Zoo. The other two were erected on 7th June 1867. They cost £550. 1/2
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History of Leeds | James Rhodes 16h
Oswiu defeated Penda at ⚔ of Winwaed, thought by many to have been at Whinmoor, Leeds where it is recalled by various place names such as Pendas Fields, Penda's Way and Penda's Walk. There is, however, no definitive evidence for the battle's location.
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History of Leeds | James Rhodes retweeted
Leeds Civic Trust Feb 14
Replying to @ragtime_willie
They were brilliant when they came back to unveil the blue plaque too!
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History of Leeds | James Rhodes Feb 14
Replying to @ChrisNickson2
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History of Leeds | James Rhodes Feb 14
Five shillings in 1797, rising to £10 by 1926.
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History of Leeds | James Rhodes Feb 14
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History of Leeds | James Rhodes Feb 14
Replying to @BradfordMuseums
Most recent case of wife selling in Leeds that I could find was in 1926!
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