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@rem
Suspect this only helps me, but I wanted a webgui for transforming globs of text into JSON that I could feed into software.
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@rem Sep 1
Replying to @rem
Really didn't think people would find *that* useful. The code is pretty messy. I wrote it quickly this morning.
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Charlie Whisky Sep 1
Replying to @rem
Okay, how do I use the splitter?
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@rem Sep 1
Replying to @BrightApollo
Add splitter, then give it a string to split using (if its a tab or space, use a literal character). Also, play around, should be able to visualise the usage
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Charlie Whisky Sep 1
Replying to @rem
Ha, I had UOrigin not set right... it's working now and I love it. THANK YOU
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Abhimanyu Aryan Lifts 💪 Sep 1
Replying to @rem
damn I need to practice more regex :(
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@rem Sep 1
Replying to @iAbhimanyuAryan
The "matches" options will only go into full regex if you lead and end with / - and the code errors quietly (because I wrote it all in an hour! 😃)
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Carlos Fonseca Sep 1
Replying to @rem
Nice! Kinda wish one could save the transforms (some url shenanigans or something) for reuse later.
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@rem Sep 1
Replying to @carlosefonseca
Yeah, I can see saving the rules to the URL as straight forward, but it won't include the source text.
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Federico Brigante Sep 1
Replying to @rem @csswizardry
This is the sort of things that I'm 100% sure can be done on the command line (for any file or API response) but I don't know which tool lets me see the results as I type the commands, like your tool does.
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@rem Sep 1
Replying to @fregante @csswizardry
Oh, that's exactly how I cleaned it up first time. I'm getting a dab hand at awk, but I wanted something with the webgui so I could make it a little more approachable (plus the preview)
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Shane Smith Sep 3
Replying to @rem @code
My current approach for similar tasks is multi-line editing in an IDE (e.g. ). Works wonders.
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@rem Sep 3
Replying to @shanesmithau @code
I tend to reach for awk + jq
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Dave Stewart Sep 1
Replying to @rem
I wrote something very similar back in 2013. Had a zillion plans to update it but you know... on to the next project and all!
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Dave Stewart Sep 1
Replying to @rem
A few screenshots...
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dataPixy Sep 2
Replying to @dave_stewart @rem
wow! so many features & examples in it. should I like port some of those capabilities to ext. I am working on? 🤔 I def. see a utility in simple raw data tools like this.
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Dave Stewart Sep 3
Replying to @TarasNovak @rem
The original plan had been to make a standalone, extensible library, as well as the app. I've a ton of notes, sketches and plans - hopefully I'll come back to this project at some point!
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dataPixy Sep 3
Replying to @dave_stewart @rem
I can tell you spent a lot of time on it. Mind if I borrow some of those ideas for my vscode ext.? I've been running out of fresh ideas of what other things devs would like to do with their data files. yours gives me a few interesting twists to explore :) well done!
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Dave Stewart Sep 3
Replying to @TarasNovak @rem
Have fun!
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Dan Kaminsky Sep 1
Replying to @rem @janl
This is clever and I’ll be studying it.
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Nacho 👟 Berlin Sep 1
Replying to @rem
You re-implemented Trifacta in a morning 😲
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