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Reed F. Richardson
Amazing reporting by on the fatal flaws in the Boeing 737 MAX's flight control system—and the regulatory capture within the FAA to hastily approve it. Essentially, this plane could try to crash itself because of a single faulty sensor.
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Reed F. Richardson Apr 21
Replying to @nytimes
This follow-up exposé by the is equally damning. It details how Boeing's non-union plant in SC routinely leaves debris/junk in 787s, pushes employees to work faster than they're capable, & punishes employees who call out shoddy production habits.
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Chris Mahan Mar 17
So basically lack of funding for government agencies that provide oversight.
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jeanne fisher Mar 17
Also, no one followed up on pilot complaints made to that NASA site.
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Naomi Nagata Mar 17
“Both Boeing and the FAA were informed of the specifics of this story and were asked for responses 11 days ago, before the second crash of a 737 MAX last Sunday.” Before. Before the second crash.
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Tommie Smith’s Raised Fist Mar 18
After a failure of this magnitude, and in a working democracy, Boeing would pay all of its profits for the next few years to the families of the crash victims and there would be Congressional hearings and a review of the FAA’s role and functions. So far, nothing
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Darren LaMarr Mar 17
Add this to that problem...
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Kecka Mar 18
B-but nanny state, though! S-socialism! R-regulation never w-works! P-private businesses a-are always b-better!
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Robbert Dinero Mar 17
It's bizarre aviation authorities would approve an automatic safety system that depends on pilots knowing how and when to disable it, in order to avoid catastrophic failure.
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This is Moxie's wife. I don't normally post here Mar 18
Don’t forget that they didn’t put an indicator light for pilots to see that, not only is it engaged, but that it reengaged after performing the disengagement procedure.
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*BSA* Mar 17
And yet, the GOP will keep beating the drum for deregulation. They don't care WHAT they deregulate, just that they ARE.
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Deepak Vaid Mar 18
What is more damning for both the and , is that the published a detailed report on Nov 28 of last year outlining EXACTLY how the , caused the crash. They had literally MONTHS to fix the problem and/or inform airlines, but they didn't.
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pmichael Mar 17
As much as I like & respect Gates' Boeing reporting, word of caution abt "Reg capture". In 20+ years I've never seen nor heard of ANY FAA delegate bending to biz pressure. FAA delegates have always been compliance first & FO any other priority
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pmichael Mar 17
Additionally - NO, the 737MAX will not crash itself due to a "single faulty sensor". Not the way Boeing or Airbus planes are designed, manufactured, operated. Multiple redundancy and it is thoroughly tested
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Jason Horwitz Mar 17
This is optimistic. More likely is these systems are qualified by analysis or similarity. Since this is a 737 variant, many of the systems probably haven’t been tested thoroughly in years, relying instead on field experience
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pmichael Mar 18
Replying to @jgwitz @reedfrich and 3 others
NO. ALL systems are tested for certification. Beyond only functional system tests for Type Cert, the test programs are validated & ALL design/build processes are monitored for compliance on each individual airplane built
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djronnebaum Mar 18
Each aircraft system will, or should have, a functional test performed at time of build. Once the aircraft or aircraft system is certified, it does not have to be tested to the same level as if it's being certified again.
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pmichael Mar 18
Correct. All systems testing is influenced by previous results, not only for aircraft, but any system of systems.
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Belle de Jour Mar 17
Michael Crichton predicted this in the novel Airframe.
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