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reclaim UC
Here's another account of the drastic increase in the price of college in California since the 1970s, which has some useful data and nice visualizations, but also misses some important stuff
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reclaim UC Jun 5
Replying to @reclaimuc
1. The article blames rising tuition strictly on the interference of politicians and state budget cuts, rather than university administrators' efforts to generate more revenue (although it rightly points out that this push has been bipartisan).
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reclaim UC Jun 5
Replying to @reclaimuc
2. It overlooks financialization, e.g. the suggestion that post-2008 austerity meant putting construction on hold misses what Bob Meister pointed out in 2009: state budget cuts can actually be good for bond ratings, which helps universities raise money for new construction.
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reclaim UC Jun 5
Replying to @reclaimuc
2.5. Here's a link to Bob Meister's important piece "They Pledged Your Tuition."
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reclaim UC Jun 5
Replying to @reclaimuc
3. By privileging state budget cuts and sidelining administrative efforts to bring in more revenue, the article can't explain why tuition at *private* colleges has risen so much as well. All the explanations it offers apply equally to public colleges.
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reclaim UC Jun 5
Replying to @reclaimuc
4. Something we've been arguing for awhile is that it's important to remember the role of administrators in the restructuring of higher education. They haven't been passive onlookers but active participants in these transformations.
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reclaim UC Jun 5
Replying to @reclaimuc
5. To paraphrase Meister, of course the state should fully fund public higher education, but unless administrators change what they're trying to do and how they're trying to do it, more state money won't bring back the "Master Plan."
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