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Daniel A. Gross
1. On the fifth floor of a beloved New York institution, the , the remains of 12,000 people sit in cabinets and cardboard boxes.
Thousands of Herero people died in a genocide. Why are Herero skulls in the American Museum of Natural History?
The New Yorker The New Yorker @NewYorker
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Daniel A. Gross Jan 24
Replying to @readwriteradio
2. Some of these remains have now been claimed by the descendants of genocide survivors. Here are two of them, Kavemuii Murangi (left) and Mekahako Komomungondo.
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Daniel A. Gross Jan 24
Replying to @readwriteradio
3. More than a century ago, during the genocide, German colonists stole several skulls and skeletons from the Herero people, in what's now Namibia.
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Daniel A. Gross Jan 24
Replying to @AMNH
4. My reporting shows that in 1923, the bought those remains as part of the collection of Felix von Luschan, an Austrian anthropologist. They paid $40,000 for more than 5,000 skulls.
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Daniel A. Gross Jan 24
Replying to @TheJewishMuseum
5. The painful irony is that Felix Warburg, a philanthropist who devoted his fortune to helping European Jews, was asked to cover the costs. His mansion now houses .
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Daniel A. Gross Jan 24
Replying to @SmithsonianMag
6. When German colonists decimated the Herero and Nama, they laid a foundation for the Holocaust. I wrote about it for in 2015:
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Daniel A. Gross Jan 24
Replying to @readwriteradio
7. In the US, thanks to the tireless work of Native activists, federal law requires museums to repatriate Native American and Native Hawaiian remains.
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Daniel A. Gross Jan 24
Replying to @readwriteradio
8. But the law doesn't cover remains taken from outside North America. Which means affected communities, like the Herero, have to research and request repatriation on their own.
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Daniel A. Gross Jan 24
Replying to @AMNH @NMNH and 2 others
9. The is not unusual. Countless natural history museums, from to to , have collected human skulls and skeletons to study race and biology.
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Daniel A. Gross Jan 24
Replying to @readwriteradio
10. At one time, the U.S. Army even asked soldiers to to drag the bodies of fallen Native Americans off battlefields and ship them to the Army Medical Museum.
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Daniel A. Gross Jan 24
Replying to @AMNH
11. The fifth floor of the contains one legacy of that era.
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Daniel A. Gross Jan 24
Replying to @readwriteradio
12. The story of colonialism continues. Tomorrow, Herero descendants will appear in federal court in New York. They aim to force Germany to pay reparations to the Herero and Nama.
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Daniel A. Gross Jan 24
Replying to @readwriteradio
13. I'd be truly grateful if you'd read their story and pass it on.
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Love.Lilaa Jan 24
Replying to @readwriteradio
:)
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Ayofemi Jan 25
Replying to @readwriteradio
Thank you for writing this story.
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Daniel A. Gross Jan 25
Replying to @Ayofemi
Thank you, for reading it and passing it on.
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Helena Okekai Jan 25
Replying to @readwriteradio @AMNH
Perhaps post WWIII ppl will scrape flesh from Trump supporters so that THEIR skulls can be studied! For their tiny space for any cerebral activity?
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Helena Okekai Jan 25
Replying to @readwriteradio
Any construction done here in Hawaiian Islands must cease immediately when any iwi (bones) are found so that curators at Bishop museum can study their age. Ppl came over in 3rd cent from Marquesas. Problem is that burial sites weren’t used. Their iwi lay where they died.
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MrK001 Jan 27
Replying to @readwriteradio @AMNH
Even more, the people of Namibia deserve to get their land back. Genocide And The Second Reich "Africa to Auschwitz: Germany, Genocide and Denial" Part 1: Opening Remarks
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ayse utku Feb 12
Replying to @readwriteradio @AMNH
Everyone should read this article!!
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