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React
React is a declarative, efficient, and flexible JavaScript library for building user interfaces.
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React Nov 17
Replying to @0xca0a
We've added some barebones documentation for building custom renderers now! Hope it's helpful, even if incomplete.
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React Nov 17
Replying to @ZeeCoder @swyx
Not at the moment, but preparing documentation for library authors and collecting a list of common problems and solutions will be a prerequisite to the stable release.
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React Nov 17
Replying to @swyx
Mostly, the behind-the-scenes work to productionize it. It doesn't sound very glamorous but it mostly consists of bugfixes, removing unnecessary API options, improving the heuristics, and making the necessary refactors and semantic changes so we don't churn the community later.
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React retweeted
Jenn Creighton Nov 16
Realized I've accidentally created a mini-course on React component architecture: Flexibility 👉 Principles 👉 Composition 👉
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React Nov 13
Replying to @mattmangels @davigoli
If the question was about *how* Fast Refresh works, here's how: 1. The updated code is sent to the browser 2. New version of the component file is executed 3. React "sees" a different version of that component, and updates the existing places where it appears on the screen.
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React Nov 13
Replying to @mattmangels @davigoli
What toolkit are you using to run your app? If you use Create React App, this is already how it works with react-scripts@4.x and higher!
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React retweeted
Vercel Oct 27
Next.js 10 is available today, and you can upgrade with just one command. Automatically optimize images using the new `next/image` component, go global with built-in internationalization primitives, and much more. More announcements coming, stay tuned.
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React Nov 5
Replying to @tannerlinsley
You might wonder: "what about invalidation — doesn't that require to mutate the cache?" The answer is that no, a cache is supposed to be append-only. Invalidation would be done by holding the cache itself in state, and doing a setState to replace it. There'll be an API to help.
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React Nov 5
Replying to @tannerlinsley
You can think of it as "filling the cache". Before the cache is filled, it would always throw. So doesn't break the rules. After the cache is filled, it would always produce the same result. So doesn't break the rules either. Kicking off a fetch doesn't affect any render outputs.
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React Nov 5
Not at all! We're just starting to use the official account a bit more than in the past so that people know what guidance is authoritative (before it ends up in the docs).
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React Nov 5
Replying to @tannerlinsley
We'll make sure to document the answers when the feature is stable. But the idea is that throwing itself doesn't break the rules. That includes both errors and Suspense. Throwing means "this is not ready". When React retries, it sees the ready result.
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React Nov 2
Replying to @0xca0a @IDrissAitHafid
Anyway, this is all experimental, so we don't want anyone to worry about learning these patterns yet. Certainly the hope is that for most people things will just get more responsive automatically. But we'll also provide these Hooks to fine-tune the behavior.
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React Nov 2
Replying to @0xca0a @IDrissAitHafid
Like this: setInput(newText) startTransition(() => { props.onFormUpdate(newText) }) assuming onFormUpdate updates the state somewhere above (e.g. a large context update).
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React Nov 2
Replying to @0xca0a @IDrissAitHafid
This enables new patterns we'll need to explain. E.g. it's useful for "background" updates ensuring they don't block interactions. There's a pattern where you can setState normally locally (e.g. to update an input), while making a low-pri transition way above (e.g. for a form).
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React Nov 2
Replying to @0xca0a @IDrissAitHafid
It’s not components themselves that get different priorities in CM, but state updates. You can already try useTransition(), and wrap any setState in a setTransition to lower its priority. E.g. startTransition(() => { setState(...) // normal setStates will interrupt it })
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React retweeted
Ian Sutherland 🇨🇦 Oct 23
We just released Create React App 4.0 with Fast Refresh and more! 🔥 - React 17 - TypeScript 4 - ESLint 7 - Jest 26 - PWA enhancements - Web Vitals Big thanks to , and everyone who contributed. 🙌
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React Oct 22
Replying to @kylegawley @_thunk_
Our website works with React 17 — so if you're aware of any issues, please make sure to file them!
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React Oct 20
Replying to @flybayer
No, these are still related only to the experimental releases. We add them to the changelog for every release now but maybe it’s worth removing from the post to reduce the potential confusion!
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React Oct 20
Today, we’re publishing React 17 with no new features. This release will make it easier for the community to upgrade React in the future. Learn more in our blog post!
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React Oct 16
Replying to @truedsn
We aren't aware of this behavior, please file an issue so we can look?
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