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Arvind Narayanan 16 Apr 18
7 simple steps to control your privacy: —Quit Facebook —Install an ad/tracker blocker —Destroy your smartphone —Paint your face before going outside —Write opt-out letters to each of the 4,000 data brokers —Avoid other humans (FB gets your data from them) —Move to a remote forest
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Arvind Narayanan 16 Apr 18
Replying to @random_walker
This list was brought to you by the Council for Privacy as Individual Responsibility.
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Arvind Narayanan 16 Apr 18
Replying to @random_walker
There’s actually a neat art project on camouflaging your face to fool face recognition systems deployed in public spaces:
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Arvind Narayanan 16 Apr 18
Replying to @random_walker
There really are thousands of data brokers in the US alone. We know of a handful, and the rest are secret. Maybe a data broker should sell a list of all the data brokers.
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Arvind Narayanan 16 Apr 18
Replying to @random_walker
The Onion was way ahead of this issue, as usual. From 2009:
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Arvind Narayanan
See below for more on why privacy-as-individual-responsibility isn’t adequate. Experts have been saying this for years, but it’s become clear from recent events like the Strava heatmap and Facebook/Cambridge Analytica. Let’s retire this way of thinking!
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Arvind Narayanan 16 Apr 18
Replying to @random_walker
Agreed! That wasn't the intent at all, but rather that privacy is a shared societal value and will require collective action.
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Billy Moreno 16 Apr 18
Replying to @random_walker
Really feels like a herd immunity situation. Privacy inoculates against systemic dehumanization and oppression.
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Rainer Smart AI Blockchain Rehak 4.0 18 Apr 18
Replying to @random_walker @t_grote
Wonderful, now let's apply this thinking to too and we are another step closer to a really desirable .
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becky kazansky 16 Apr 18
Replying to @random_walker
Here's my article where I argue this; with a case study on the harms of Facebook
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J 17 Apr 18
Replying to @random_walker @Snowden
Indeed. For the same reason that employees are often unable to individually negotiate better working conditions and wages, privacy is rarely a negotiation between two parties on equal footing and ability to "walk away".
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Civil Disobedience 17 Apr 18
Replying to @random_walker @Snowden
I'm sorry, you're joking, right? The GOVERNMENT, BUREAUCRATS, and REGULATORS will protect our privacy? The same GOVERNMENT that revealed as corrupt desecrators of public trust and - privacy? No. Privacy will be secured through cryptography. The Gov't can't be trusted.
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Sushil K 16 Apr 18
Replying to @random_walker
We need to rethink data and embrace data abstention, as explained here:
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Dᴏᴡʟᴘʜᴡɪɴ 17 Apr 18
Replying to @random_walker
I think I'd be fine with privacy as individual responsibility if the individual was allowed to use any means necessary. If we could put that into law, the problem would solve itself very quickly. We might not even have to move a finger.
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Run, sci fi for Catholics 17 Apr 18
I am not sure exactly what you mean by privacy, but if it includes free access to pornography, I do not agree. The violence and operating definition of intimacy communicated by pornography is utterly ruining us as a people.
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Kowka Blar 19 Apr 18
Replying to @random_walker
можно надеть хиджаб, дебил🤣
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