Twitter | Search | |
Marx Zuckerberg (aka Ryan Heuser)
Updated academic job numbers for English Lit (with data scraped from Academic Jobs Wiki). Since last posting on Oct 13th, 88 new TT jobs have been added. But that still leaves us at an all-time low, pretty far into the season.
Reply Retweet Like More
Marx Zuckerberg (aka Ryan Heuser) Nov 18
Replying to @quadrismegistus
* For a better view of Figure 4, see here: * For code which generated these, see here: * For the figures from Oct 13th, see here:
Reply Retweet Like
Jillian Snyder Nov 20
Replying to @quadrismegistus
Just to confirm: the job numbers in the past reflect the total of the entire year while these numbers reflect postings up to ~Nov. 18th. Is that correct?
Reply Retweet Like
Marx Zuckerberg (aka Ryan Heuser) Nov 20
Replying to @jillianmsnyder
Yes, that's correct: the 2019 data can't be read in the same way as the other years, since the 2019-2020 job market season isn't over yet. I'm beginning to wonder whether I've created more misinformation than information, since many people are focusing only on the last data point
Reply Retweet Like
🌼🌷👻 Dr Jen Baker 💀🌷🌼 Nov 19
Replying to @quadrismegistus
Is this data Global, US, UK, Anglophone do we know?
Reply Retweet Like
Marx Zuckerberg (aka Ryan Heuser) Nov 19
Replying to @Jendeavour
It’s pretty global: regularly lists jobs in US, UK, Netherlands, Germany, etc. (Only requirement is job is in English or Comparative Lit.) It’s aggregated by volunteers on the market, so it tends to be as global as they are. Though I still suspect it tilts American...
Reply Retweet Like
Jim Ridolfo Nov 18
Replying to @quadrismegistus
2nd lowest in last seven years for r/c & tbw -
Reply Retweet Like
R V 5 5 M 4 ¥ O, phd Nov 18
Yes, I noticed that. I’m on the R/C job market at the moment. Many of the R/C jobs have specifically sough scholars in cultural rhetorics. Notice also that the ethnic studies in lit market doubled from last year, and up 50% from the previous year. Important shifts!
Reply Retweet Like
Eric Newman Nov 19
Replying to @quadrismegistus
This is the reality, folks. Entering cohorts should be discussing these numbers in first year professionalization seminars. Grad curricula should provide opportunities (and encouragement) for exploring how PhD training and research can be developed into non-TT careers.
Reply Retweet Like
Eric Newman Nov 19
Replying to @quadrismegistus
I don’t mean that humanities PhD training needs to be transformed into vocational training for careers outside of academe — the beauty of a hum PhD is getting to do our kind of research — but rather that it makes students aware of alternate career paths in a real way early on.
Reply Retweet Like
Valerie J. Malott, MA Nov 19
Replying to @quadrismegistus
Agreed. I'm entering my final semester of my MA in English and work as an adjunct at a local CC. We got "off track" in comp studies class last week and discussed the amounts various types of faculty make. Prof sem would help
Reply Retweet Like