Twitter | Search | |
Trisha Velarmino
A storyteller and a friend to many amazing women.
44,955
Tweets
1,108
Following
5,370
Followers
Tweets
Trisha Velarmino Jul 7
Totally overjoyed by the wonder of being alive.
Reply Retweet Like
Trisha Velarmino Jun 23
Replying to @psimonmyway
It’s also amusing how International news shape us, and who we follow on social media kind of directs what we should believe in and what we should not.
Reply Retweet Like
Trisha Velarmino Jun 23
Replying to @psimonmyway
When I say it in-person or over the phone (I always have to explain myself why I live in Mexico), people don’t pay attention. But when I publish it on social media, they listen and they believe me.
Reply Retweet Like
Trisha Velarmino Jun 23
Replying to @psimonmyway
“Mark yourself safe: “Th Earthquake Across Oaxaca and Mexico City, Mexico,” Facebook suggested. And I did. I don’t live near these Mexican states. But that really gave people the assurance that I was safe - to mark myself ‘safe’ on Facebook.
Reply Retweet Like
Trisha Velarmino Jun 23
Replying to @psimonmyway
They called it the Moro Gulf earthquake with the magnitude of 8.0. Even if I was alive in 1976, that’s way too south of where I grew up in. Still, I am asked earthquake-tsunami-volcanic eruption-relations questions even if I don’t really know the answer.
Reply Retweet Like
Trisha Velarmino Jun 23
Replying to @psimonmyway
Here, I am famous for the Dec 26, 04 tsunami in the Indian Ocean that took 230k lives in just a few hours. I am from the Philippines and have never experienced a tsunami in my life. The last tsunami in the country was in Aug 17, ‘76 in Lebak, Mindanao, west of the Celebes Sea.
Reply Retweet Like
Trisha Velarmino Jun 23
Replying to @psimonmyway
‘Sort of’ because a friend of mine from Mar de Plata, the second largest city in Buenos Aires Province of Argentina Whatsapped me today, “Hi Trish, how are you? With this earthquake is there a possibility of a tsunami?”
Reply Retweet Like
Trisha Velarmino Jun 23
Replying to @psimonmyway
My mother called as the news reached far beyond Mexico. It was 23:58 and sort of the first time I heard about it — from my mother who lives in Subic Bay, the west coast of the island of Luzon in the Philippines.
Reply Retweet Like
Trisha Velarmino Jun 23
On June 23, 2020, a 7.5-magnitude earthquake hit southern and central Mexico. I live in the Pacific coast of Mexico - if you want to understand this location better, it’s about 25h drive from San Diego (CA), 19h 24m from Austin (TX), and 1d 2h from Phoenix (AZ), all non-stop.
Reply Retweet Like
Trisha Velarmino retweeted
Medium Apr 22
The mental health fallout of Covid-19 will be huge for health workers and all Americans.
Reply Retweet Like
Trisha Velarmino Apr 21
Replying to @psimonmyway
More often than not, praising yourself is being frowned upon. In this time of uncertainty, I ask you to do it. Praise yourself. It's good for your mental health especially in the world we live in now. Encourage yourself with your own words.
Reply Retweet Like
Trisha Velarmino Apr 21
Replying to @psimonmyway
So every time I am called "privileged, sheltered, and spoiled," I cannot think of anything more painful than that.
Reply Retweet Like
Trisha Velarmino Apr 21
Replying to @psimonmyway
I am proud to say that I have a family who watched me make that choice from afar with emotional support. I am proud of myself for dreaming BIG - and for realizing those dreams and bringing to life my own ideas of the life I want, or who I want to be.
Reply Retweet Like
Trisha Velarmino Apr 21
Replying to @psimonmyway
My family pushed me to do that by not providing me with everything when I chose to leave home. I am proud to say that all my privileges in life right now were from my hard work and the adversaries that went with it.
Reply Retweet Like
Trisha Velarmino Apr 21
Replying to @psimonmyway
I like where I came from. I love how my family has supported me on this journey. But I also love the fact that even if I had all the opportunities to stay at home and enjoy a "fancy" life, I went out here and embarked on my own fate.
Reply Retweet Like
Trisha Velarmino Apr 21
Replying to @psimonmyway
that privilege comes from leaving a comfortable home scrubbing toilets as a teenager in a hostel in Ecuador, working as a waitress in a restaurant in Cusco, doing odd jobs (from being a mascot to dressing as a fairy for an event).
Reply Retweet Like
Trisha Velarmino Apr 21
Replying to @psimonmyway
When this happened to me, I told myself, "the day has come. It's today. You are officially an adult." I was 21. In here, I've been always looked at as "gente de dinero y privilegios" (people with money and privileges) and most of the people who call me this don't really know that
Reply Retweet Like
Trisha Velarmino Apr 21
Replying to @psimonmyway
That's also the time when I learned that we'll never know when we become an adult. There is no particular age. Some say it's 26. Others think that being an adult comes when you get married and have babies. Or when you move out of the house.
Reply Retweet Like
Trisha Velarmino Apr 21
Replying to @psimonmyway
I thought that when I asked for money, she will give it to me. But she didn't. It made me feel frustrated and abandoned until one day, I thought: "she's right. Which mother will spend money to send her teenage child around the world while there are 4 other kids to feed?"
Reply Retweet Like
Trisha Velarmino Apr 21
Replying to @psimonmyway
I sometimes overheard that she had money troubles but she never showed it to us. Everything that I needed was provided for. The time came that I moved out of the house and my mother cut me off. I didn't believe that she can stomach that I am doing odd jobs in my adventures.
Reply Retweet Like