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Trisha Velarmino
A storyteller and a friend to many amazing women.
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Trisha Velarmino Nov 27
Replying to @psimonmyway
Ending this thread with, "Living well and beautifully and justly are all one thing." -- Socrates
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Trisha Velarmino Nov 27
Replying to @psimonmyway
Stop. Close your eyes. Take a deep breath. Silently ask yourself this question: "Am I happy?" If the answer is yes, then you got the right balance. You are in the right place. If the answer is no, don't worry, you still have time to 'edit' and figure it out. Take it easy.
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Trisha Velarmino Nov 27
Replying to @psimonmyway
And life? Above all, life? A good life is not about 'not working' or working hard. A good life is about doing something you love and being happy about it. It's not about traveling the world, oh please. A good life is about going out there and knowing that WHAT YOU DO MATTERS.
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Trisha Velarmino Nov 27
Replying to @psimonmyway
Give no judgment to people who take pleasure from working hard or working less or not working at all. To each his own: we are all entitled to label things as "happy" so long as you know how to identify it.
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Trisha Velarmino Nov 27
Replying to @psimonmyway
If procrastinating makes you happier the next, do it. Work is important. It pays for the bills. It's an emblem of our skills, talents, and hard work. It means we are pursuing something we are good at.
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Trisha Velarmino Nov 27
Replying to @psimonmyway
So, I concluded, there is no such thing as work and life balance. You can work 20 hours on Monday and then 3 on Tuesday. It's all up to you. It's personal. If drowning in work makes you happy today, do it.
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Trisha Velarmino Nov 27
Replying to @psimonmyway
The following year, I tried to work less. It was going pretty well until I realised I miss working. I am sick and tired of not having a routine. It wasn't fulfilling. It was a difficult time and man, I was really confused. All the while, everyone thought I have the best job ever.
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Trisha Velarmino Nov 27
Replying to @psimonmyway
Those 40 hours/week that I was in beautiful places was spent in front of the computer because the life I wanted needed financial resource. I was not able to really see some places "I've been to." However, there were times I liked the idea of working too much.
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Trisha Velarmino Nov 27
Replying to @psimonmyway
The only difference is I was in different places: at a beach house in Copacabana, Rio de Janeiro; while facing the glaciers of Perito Moreno; on a cruise from Colombia to Panama; in a 5-star hostel in the tropics. And believe me, it did not guarantee my consistent happiness.
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Trisha Velarmino Nov 27
Replying to @psimonmyway
I know this because I've tried how to work more and work less: it's just the same. It's not about the number of hours you work (which a lot of people think). When I first tried my 'remote job' in 2013, I've spent 40 hours a week on work just like normal people.
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Trisha Velarmino Nov 27
The truth about balancing your life and your work: IT'S A MYTH. There is no such thing as "I am going to take a break from work to balance my life" and vice-versa.
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Trisha Velarmino Nov 23
Replying to @psimonmyway
The goal is that everyone, whether you’re a man, woman, Jewish, Muslim, black, Asian, LGBTQ, you name it, should get on Instagram and see someone who looks like them and recognize themselves in them and hopefully learn about their importance in the fabric of society.
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Trisha Velarmino Nov 23
Replying to @psimonmyway
In all my interactions in different cultures all over the world, I noticed that the more you normalize who you are, the more people will stop looking at you differently. I am not trying to change how the world looks at women of color.
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Trisha Velarmino Nov 23
Replying to @psimonmyway
I never understood what was wrong with that because that’s how my family has always been. We may be not normal for many but we felt very normal about our set-up. The more I thought about it, the more I said what I thought out loud.
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Trisha Velarmino Nov 23
Replying to @psimonmyway
I also have 2 gay uncles who helped my mom raise us. When I was 9 years old, having this in my life was pretty normal until the people from my school made fun of me for having gay uncles while their mothers gossiped about my mom being a single mother.
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Trisha Velarmino Nov 23
Replying to @psimonmyway
I watched our neighbors talk about their poor life choices and they prevailed. They have been a walking validation of the kind of woman I should be. I did not really turn out to be like them. I don't even think I can't be half of who they are and what they've achieved.
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Trisha Velarmino Nov 23
Replying to @psimonmyway
I grew up with a front-row seat to what normalizing life looks like. My mother was a single mother raising 5 children. She is best friends with my two divorced aunties and one non-traditionally married one. I watched them fight the feminist battle and they won.
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Trisha Velarmino Nov 23
Replying to @psimonmyway
I feel like our eyes always have filters on the people we meet. We immediately identify the people we meet by how they look like or what tribe they belong to. But the truth is, this should be normal. This is NORMAL.
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Trisha Velarmino Nov 23
Replying to @psimonmyway
I thought before I speak: “I am not changing how the world looks at women of color. I am normalizing it because it is our reality. There are black people, Asian people, Muslims, Jews, LGBTQ - this is normal. It should be normal. It ain’t out of the ordinary.
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Trisha Velarmino Nov 23
In one interview I did with BBC UK, they noticed I kept mentioning being a person of color and a woman: “why is it very important for you to change how the world looks at women of color?”
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